Featured post

mba_apps_open

 

The applications for the London Business School MBA programme starting in August 2018 are now open and that means you can start preparing your submissions for the first round deadline.

We believe that preparation and time is the key to a successful application. Therefore, to make the process as smooth as possible, we have put together a checklist for you to use to start your application as the first deadline is fast approaching.

Start planning for your GMAT/GRE tests. Practice makes perfect! This is the time to prepare yourself for a competitive result that will strengthen your application. Our average GMAT score is 707, with a range from 600-790. Rest assured that the Admissions Committee will be reviewing all the elements of the application holistically. Keep in mind a low GMAT/GRE score will not automatically exclude you from the admissions process, and a high score will not necessarily grant you a place onto the programme. Although, a high score will make your application more competitive against the applicant pool.

Start preparing your essays. Essays are a vital aspect of your application and we recommend that you spend a significant amount of time drafting them. You can start by gathering your thoughts about what you would like to write about. Talk to your colleagues, friends and family and ask for feedback on the authenticity of your essays and ask if they reflect your personality.

The essay questions for the MBA2020 application are:

  1. What are your post-MBA goals and how will your prior experience and the London Business School programme contribute towards these? (500 words)
  2. Is there any other information you believe the Admissions Committee should know about you and your application to London Business School? (OPTIONAL) (500 words)

 

Take this time to decide on who will be your referees. The Admissions Committee will preferably want two professional references, but we do understand that a current employer might not be an option for you for various reasons. I would like to emphasize that content is more important than the status of your referee. You do not necessarily have to go C-Suite. We would like to get to know you better, and we would strongly suggest choosing referees whom you trust to dedicate time to your reference. They should know you very well and work or have worked with you closely. That could be your current/previous line manager, a trusted colleague, even a client or your stakeholders.

Make this decision wisely, and perhaps take them out for a coffee to explain your motivations and aspirations behind your application to our MBA programme. Once you have opened the online application, you may submit your referees’ details before application submission. Your referees will then receive an online form via email for them to complete.

You must submit your scores of an English language test if you have not lived, studied or worked in an English-speaking environment for more than 2 years, then you must submit your scores of an English language test. This test must have been taken within the last two years. We accept the following tests: TOEFL, IELTS, CPE, PTE (Pearson Test of English) and CAE.

If you are unsure of any steps throughout the process, please do get in touch at mba@london.edu We are always happy to talk with you! Our team will be on the road throughout the year, so keep an eye on our events page to find out when we are travelling to your area! This is a great chance for us to connect with you in person about your application process.

If you are planning on visiting London, contact us to learn about our Drop-in sessions, monthly information sessions or coffee chats. This is a great opportunity for you to meet with staff and current students in order to learn more about the LBS experience.

The new deadlines for our MBA2020 are now available on our website.

 

 

I wish you all the best of luck with your application. We look forward to getting to know you!

 

Chrispa Palaiologou


Featured post

Summer is the time of changes in the world of admissions. On Friday 14 July we said goodbye to the MBA2017 class who had their official congregation ceremony at the Royal Festival Hall in London. It was a bitter sweet day. On one hand we celebrated the success of the MBA2017 class who have completed their MBA and are about to embark on new and exciting adventures all around the world; on the other hand we also had to send them our farewells as we’ll no longer bump into them on campus. We will definitely miss that! It’s been two years since we first welcomed the class on campus at their official Orientation day and it has been an incredible two years watching them go through their transformational MBA journey. This class has had a real positive impact on the LBS community and it is hard to only mention a few reasons why they are such a great bunch. BUT my two favorite highlights from this class has been its take on inclusion and diversity.

The Women in Business Club officially launched the Man-bassador scheme which aims to encourage both men and women to openly discuss issues regarding gender diversity. The scheme has created opportunities for all students to learn how to be a successful male ally, and promote the message of equality to fellow students. This very important initiative from the Women in Business Club will be carried over to this year’s presidents who are continuing to build bridges and include allies in the discussion. Speaking of diversity and inclusion, the MBA2017 class has also been instrumental in propelling the Out in Business Club. Their mission is to raise awareness of the LGBT+ community, promote diversity and facilitate interaction between its members and other LGBT+ business networks. Last year the club organised the biggest ever EurOut conference, attracting more than 200 students from 45 leading global business schools and universities and speakers from BCG (the event’s lead sponsor), McKinsey, Cisco, Google, KPMG, Telegraph Group and Mishcon de Reya just to name a few. It has been an incredible experience watching the Out in Business club grow both in size and presence (the intake of openly LGBT+ students at LBS has more than trebled since 2010) and I am confident that the club will continue to make a positive contribution not only to LBS, but to the wider community as well.

The MBA2017 class have of course been involved in many, many more activites and causes, and these are just a couple of my personal highlights. So while we say goodbye to an amazing class, we are also saying hello to a brand new MBA class,  something we in admissions are really excited about! We have been working with the new class since our first application deadline in September and in just a few weeks we welcome all 430 of them on campus. The new class will be as diverse as previous MBA classes, with students from over 70 different nationalities and of course from a variety of different professional backgrounds.

I was privileged to meet some of the new members of the MBA2019 class last month when I went to the annual Forte Foundation conference. At London Business School we invite our Forte Scholarship recipients to join the conference and this year we had four of our MBA2019 admits attending. Inspirational as always, this year the conference was hosted by Amazon in their home town of Seattle, Washington. Whether it was Amazon, the amazing line-up of speakers or the Forte Foundation’s amazing brand, this year’s conference ended up completely sold out! It was attended by more than 600 incoming or current MBA women from over 40 different schools in North America and Europe.  Four of those 600 attendees are starting their MBA at LBS in just a few weeks:

-          Sherry, a brand manager for Clif Bar in California and a wine enthusiast. Enthusiast is actually a real understatement, Sherry has not only worked in vineyards in Napa, she is also named after two wines…Sherry Rose. Sherry’s marketing experience will be extremely valuable for her classmates at LBS, but so will her experience in wine, particularly in the Wine and Spirits club!

- Neressa is a scientist at BioMarin Pharmaceiticals Inc, a biotechnology company which focuses on treatments for rare genetic diseases that mostly affect children. Neressa’s unique science background in a very male-dominated world will provide different perspectives to the classroom discussions. Neressa will bring a completely unique set of skills to her class.

-          Elsa, a finance major who started her career on the trading floor, but later moved into retail in merchandice planning at Macy’s in New York. She is also a keen football player which she will have plenty of opportunities to pursue in the UK.

And finally we were also joined by Shannon, a Boeing engineer specifically in charge of  designing the galleys on 737 air crafts. As part of my trip to Seattle I went to visit Boeing and now fully appreciate the immense complexity of Shannon’s work in designing and building air crafts. So there they are, four women from the MBA2019 class at London Business School each bringing a unique and diverse perspective to their new community. As part of my job I have read most of the applications from the new class and I can tell you that Sherry, Neressa, Elsa and Shannon will be joining a great group of unique and diverse individuals.

So while we were sad to say goodbye to the MBA2017s we also celebrated their achievements and we look forward to welcome the new group of MBAs who are all keen to make an impact on the LBS community.

Forte Conference - fellows


Ignite your entrepreneurial spirit

Do you have ambitions of developing your own business venture? If you have between seven and 22 years of experience and a strong professional track record why not consider our Executive MBA (EMBA) programme. By choosing to study your EMBA at London Business School, you will benefit from a range of services and facilities specially designed to develop and expand your entrepreneurial perspective.

The Entrepreneurship Summer School gives you the chance to assess and shape your business opportunity in a robust and practical way. This programme aims to help you to succeed as an entrepreneur by providing you with the skills you need to choose which business opportunities to pursue and how to develop those ideas into workable businesses.

The LBS Incubator programme supports a selected number of graduating students and recent graduates to use the School’s facilities to launch your business. Zipporah Gatiti, Founder of Taste of Kenya credits the Incubator for offering almost everything a new business needs, as well as a mentorship programme that goes above and beyond: “If having a mentor was the only thing I’d received, it would have been worth it. Mentors are like co-founders. They study your company, help keep you on track and hold you accountable.”

There are many opportunities to learn from the professionals, the Entrepreneurship Mentor in Residence Programme provides the chance for students to learn from expert entrepreneur mentors from a range of sectors and disciplines. The famous TELL Series also showcases successful entrepreneurs’ personal stories.

Navin Valrani studied the EMBA Dubai programme and the two years changed his life and career forever. “It was wonderful in so many aspects,” he says. “First of all, the knowledge that you pick up on the EMBA gives you a fantastic toolkit to work with. You’re exposed to the most outstanding faculty you could possibly come across, and you can socialise with them after class and have some really good informal discussions. I am where I am today in my life, and with the growth rates of the businesses that I lead, because of LBS.”

Lidia Chmel decided it was time for a change of company, function and industry and founded her own company, Mama’s Dream Club. She says “I would never have had the courage to start my own company without the EMBA programme. Exploring case studies and hearing from guest speakers who had founded their own companies showed me that it was eminently possible to change direction and still be successful.”

The LBS Entrepreneurship Club provides a forum for students to network and share ideas and an environment which fosters innovation and entrepreneurship and helps students to cultivate and develop their own ideas.

Heather Baker, Founder & CEO, Top Line Comms says of her EMBA experience “The EMBA has been an exceptional experience, both personally and professionally. I am far more confident and analytical in the way I approach business development now, so much so that the company has doubled in size over the last 18 months. I’m not originally from London, so for me, making new contacts with the local business community has been just as vital as linking to the huge global network the School offers.” 

If you are thinking about how you’ll finance your venture, we have relationships with Sussex Place Ventures and Enterprise 100, who have been fundamental in helping new start-ups. Students also have the opportunity to pitch their ideas before investors and benchmark their plans against those from other schools. Competitions include, European Business Plan of the Year Competition, Venture Capital Investment Competitions and Global Social Venture Competition. See further information about Competitions.

Start your entrepreneurial journey at LBS. The next deadline for the class starting this autumn is Tuesday 2 May. See further information on applying to the programme.

 

 


I once read that one of the reasons women should undertake an MBA programme was because the alleged “bro-ski” or fraternity culture of business school prepares you for the male executive suite. On one hand I understand the argument. If you are surrounded by this type of culture for a couple of years you may very well grow a thick skin, handle critique better, become less emotional. All the stereotypes we associate men with and assume women don’t have or can’t handle (I don’t necessarily think this is true, but for the sake of this argument I am going to make general assumptions). On the other hand the statement implies that executive suites are always going to be dominated by men, and in order for women, to be successful they should conform to the male-like norms of the C-suite.

The assumption that all business schools have a cut-throat, ruthless environment is wrong. In fact, I would argue it is the exact opposite at London Business School.  Our global community with nationalities from over  130 different countries creates an environment where different perspectives are a crucial part of the learning. In order to be successful at London Business School you will need to respect the collaborative nature of the school by building bridges rather than competing with your peers. I can say with confidence that the entire school community is collaborative, open-minded and inclusive. When you meet alumni or current students of the school they would be able to confirm this statement. We don’t believe that women should go to business school so they can “do business like a man… with men” I doubt that would go down well with most women. Instead women, just like men should pursue an MBA programme because they want to invest in themselves, their personal development, their career and lifelong network. However, women who are pursuing MBA programmes also have certain opportunities to change the c-suite and make a positive impact on gender equality.
It’s been said many times that business schools play an important role in creating the pipeline of  women leaders. I couldn’t agree more. As a top business school we are educating future global leaders. Leaders of large international organisations who will go on to shape the business of the future. The more women who go on to graduate from business schools the more women we are able to promote into leadership roles. The more women we have in leadership roles the more opportunities we have to change outdated c-suite norms, in-equality in pay, maternity leave policies and the list goes on. Don’t get me wrong, I am not implying that business schools are a single solution, but it can act as a very powerful and important catalyst.

I am very proud to work at a world-leading institution where promoting women in business is high on the agenda.  Our faculty are producing great research on the topic of gender in-equality, we have a prominent student-led Women in Business club, the School is a long-time member of the Forte Foundation and we have recently launched our own “Manbassador scheme” asking men to pledge their support to gender parity. Just last weekend our team hosted the annual Women in Business Weekend for future women on the MBA programme. We welcomed a group of MBA candidates to join us in London for a weekend of faculty lectures, sightseeing in London, afternoon tea (we are in London after all) and to participate in our 17th annual Women in Business Conference.

These are just some examples of the many activities we do every year as a school to promote women inbusiness. We are making good progress as a school by educating more and more women and bringing them into senior positions once they graduate, but we still have a way to go. Being part of the MBA recruitment & admissions team, I and the rest of our team are responsible for bringing in talented and ambitious women who are going to shape the future of leadership. It’s one of my favourite parts of the job. It creates an enormous sense of purpose knowing that we are part of helping someone achieve their goals in life, but also helping to foster positive change in gender in-equality. I have a very special interest in bringing more women to business school as I sit on the School Advisory Council for the Forte Foundation and also chair its European School Advisory group. Through the School’s work with the Forte Foundation we collaborate with major corporations, other top business schools and influential non-profit organisations to direct talented women towards leadership roles in business.
I care deeply about this cultural shift and I look forward to continuing our work as change agents not only at London Business School, but across other schools and organisations.

#BeBoldForChange

women in business weekend


We realise that a programme like the Executive MBA is a big investment for candidates, therefore we always like to ensure that we provide you with as much information as possible when taking such a big step.

Below are some examples of opportunities we have in place – in order to help you make that decision:

Class visits:

Why not attend an Executive MBA lecture, alongside other students who are currently in the programme? This will give you the chance to first-handily experience the quality of the lectures as well as the excellent interaction between students within a classroom environment.

“Through the class visit I was able to gauge the mind-set/frequency of the EMBA classroom. It enabled me to understand the importance of class participation and witness each student’s role to enrich overall class’ learning experience”. Suyash Shrivastav (EMBALJ2018)

Personal consultation:

A personal consultation gives you a chance to meet someone from the recruitment team on campus. We can guide you and answer any questions that you may have regarding the programme or the application process itself. We also regularly travel around Europe to meet candidates in a city near them.

A conversation with a member of alumni or a current student:

Although we try to give you as much information as we can when answering queries, sometimes getting those answers from current students or alumni can prove to be far more helpful and reassuring. Whilst a current student can answer any questions you may have about their EMBA journey so far, an alumnus can tell you more about their life after the programme.

CV reviews:

We encourage all prospects before taking any step in their application process to have a CV review done by one of the team members in the EMBA recruitment team. This ensures that you have the right skillset and experience needed for the programme.

Information sessions:

Our monthly information sessions are delivered by the Recruitment and Admissions teams and give prospects further information on our programmes.  These sessions also provide an opportunity for you to meet current students and alumni, as well as other candidates planning to apply to the School.

“I cannot emphasise enough the importance of attending the Information Sessions held at the school. One is able to get first hand insight into exactly what is offered on the course and also speak to other potential candidates on the night. More importantly, you get to hear first-hand experiences from a selected alumni panel which was priceless in my view” Dietrich Stadllman EMBALS2018

If you would like to find out more about any of these options, please contact the Recruitment team via email: emba@london.edu


EA_GMAC_london_business_School

 

G M A T – four letters that often strike fear in to the hearts of busy executives looking to apply to Business School. The GMAT exam provides a detailed and specific assessment of an individual’s business academics, but the lengthy preparation and examination time can be prohibitive to executive candidates.

Since March 2016, London Business School has been accepting a new way of assessing candidates for our Leadership Programmes. Working with the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) and five other top-tier Executive MBA Schools across the globe, the Executive Assessment (EA) has been designed with executive candidates in mind.

What makes the Executive Assessment an excellent tool for both Business Schools and Executive MBA candidates is its relevance.

It is relevant to executives in terms of its content as it has much more focus on critical thinking, analysis and problem solving than the GMAT and much less on pure mathematics and grammatical structures.

It is relevant in the amount of time needed for the test.  There is minimal preparation required, and the test is over in 90 minutes.

And it is relevant in its flexibility. There are no rescheduling fees, ideal for executive candidates whose schedules can often change at short notice.

EA Table

The test consists of three sections that are similar in broad themes to the GMAT – Integrated Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning.

Unlike the GMAT, all three sections count towards a final score of between 100 and 200.

 

 

 

 

So how should you prepare for the Executive Assessment?

Unlike the GMAT, there is minimal preparation required for the Executive Assessment.  but you do need to spend a little time on it, and successful candidates have spent around 1-2 days preparing.

  • Familiarise yourself with the sample questions available on GMAC’s website.
  • Depending on your background, refresh yourself with high school mathematic principles.
  • Find your local test centre from over 600 worldwide.

 

Is there a minimum score?

At LBS, we take a holistic approach to applications and, as such, look at all elements together. There is no minimum or recommended EA score (or, for that matter, GMAT) and this forms only one part of the application. We do strongly recommend you take the assessment seriously to best demonstrate your abilities and commitment to the programme. Candidates have found it a useful diagnostic to highlight areas to focus on to get ready for study.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us

sloan@london.edu                        embaglobal@london.edu                            emba@london.edu

Whichever assessment you choose to take – good luck!


A good thing to do before you fill in your application is to get a grasp of the different elements that make up an Executive MBA (EMBA) application and what the committee members are looking for whilst reading through the different parts.

admissions_febr2017

CV

The first thing that we see when initially reviewing your application, is your CV/resume. By reading through your CV we are able to take a quick glance into your background, your academics, and your work experience along with any hobbies that you may have. Therefore, this is the starting point of us assessing your eligibility for the programme.

Essay Questions

All applications that are submitted for a London Business School programme contain three essay questions and these are specific to the programme for which you are applying. The essay questions give us a chance to get to know all our applicants on a personal level therefore we look for your personal outlook on the programme, your level of self-awareness, and your collaborative skills.

References

All applications contain two references and we always advise applicants to ensure that one of the two references is completed by your current line manager. This is because your line manager is someone you work with on a daily basis, so no one would know your way of working as well as they do. Furthermore it ensures the committee that your company is informed of your application to the programme.

Transcripts

Transcripts allow us to take note of any academic or professional qualifications that you hold, allowing us to assess your academic abilities in the past, up until any professional qualifications that may have received more recently. Furthermore seeing copies of your transcripts also confirms your achievement of the academics you have listed in your application.

GMAT/EA/GRE

The GMAT, EA and GRE allow us to assess your academic ability at the time of your submission. The tests are split into two key parts of Quants and Verbal. These skillsets are what you will need the most whilst completing the EMBA, therefore the score itself and the balance between all sections of the tests is what is key for us. There is a different score for the GMAT, GRE and EA that students are expected to achieve, you can discuss this further by getting in touch with someone from our recruitment team.

Application Form

All of the above key components are attached to the actual application form itself. In the application form we are able to assess extensive details about you, that would not necessarily be visible in the documents you provide us with. Therefore, it is full of a wide range of questions from your current roles and responsibilities, to your hobbies, a reflection of your academic abilities and so on.

It is important to remember when submitting your application that the Admissions Committee takes a ‘holistic approach’ when processing all applications. Therefore we assess every individual’s assets as a whole, before inviting them in for an interview. Similarly, we review both the application and the interview feedback before making a final decision.


dhp_3928

When it comes to attracting talented workers, London is the city to beat. A report carried out by professional services firm Deloitte describes England’s capital as being “in a league of its own”, having seen a 16% rise in highly-skilled people from 2013 to 2016.

In that time, the number of talented workers moving to London rose by 235,000 to 1.7 million – higher than the 1.1 million people who relocated to New York during the same period.

There is a caveat: the report was done in March 2016, three months before the British people voted to leave the EU. Will Brexit affect London’s ability to attract highly skilled workers? No one knows at this stage, but the UK government’s message is clear: Britain is open for business and skilled workers are, as always, welcome.

Whatever happens in the coming months and years, we should feel confident that London will retain its position as one of the world’s leading business and financial centres. The city has a history of handling adversity, be it the global financial crisis of 2008 or recessions in the 1980s and 1990s, and Brexit is just another challenge to overcome.

Looking to the future, industries such as digital – which grew 32% faster than the wider UK economy from 2011 to 2014 – professional services, finance, IT, engineering and medical will continue to rely on talented people.

If anything, demand for skilled people in some sectors has never been greater. Take manufacturing, where three quarters of companies struggled to find the right employees between 2013 and 2016. An industry report by business group EEF found that the industry was suffering a skills shortage. Similarly, engineering companies are struggling to find talented people for an industry that contributes about £280 billion to the British economy.

The figures highlight a trend: that London has always relied on skilled workers, be they British or otherwise – and that will never change.

mif_201239


EMBA2018_class

On 8 January the Executive MBA team, here at London Business School were delighted to welcome the new EMBA class.

Both the Dubai and London streams came together filling the room up with 134 new faces, ready to embark on their 20 month EMBA journey. The class is made of 45 different nationalities, with an average of 12 years of experience. More importantly the rich quality of students is prominent in the diverse titles that they offer, from Managing Directors, to Entrepreneurs, to Doctors and many more.

Orientation week kicked off with an enriching preparatory talk by Professor Richard Jolly, ‘Ten things I wish I knew’. This was followed by the class’ first set of core lectures, as well as numerous networking and group work opportunities thrown into the mix.

The week concluded with a final celebration at a rooftop bar, overlooking the breath-taking London view.

The next intake for the Executive MBA London Dubai programme is September 2017. We will be announcing the new application deadlines on the website soon.

If you have any questions in the meantime, please get in touch via email: emba@london.edu.


The EMBA-Global team are proud to share that two current Americas and Europe students have been named in Forbes’ 30-under-30 in Europe for Finance.

Eleonora Sokolsky Age: 29 Residence: London EMBA-Global 2017

Eleonora Sokolsky
Age: 29
Residence: London
EMBA-Global 2017

Kiran Ganesh

Kiran Ganesh
Age: 29
Residence: London
EMBA-Global 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From over 15,000 nominations, only 600 of the brightest young entrepreneurs, breakout talents and change agents in 20 different sectors make it to the list.

Eleonora is a Vice President at J.P. Morgan in charge of a suite of Cash and Liquidity products offered to more than 2000 institutional clients across $60 billion.

Kiran meanwhile is an Executive Director at UBS Wealth Management, having joined the company in 2011.

The part-time nature of the EMBA-Global programme has allowed both these young talents to continue working whilst studying for a top Executive MBA programme offered by two of the world’s leading Business Schools – London Business School and Columbia Business School. The programme is designed to encourage students to apply their learning in the workplace to realise the real-world benefits of their classroom study.

Applications are now open for the class of 2019 – visit the EMBA-Global home page to find out more.

 


Following a year of applications, interviews, planning and preparation, Monday 9th January saw us welcome to newest students to the Sloan MSc programme. An inspiring and experienced group came together to meet for the first time and embark on their LBS adventure.

Sloan_class_stats_jan2017

 

To say the class is diverse would be an understatement, with 61 students being drawn from over 40 different cities around the world to come and study in London. Only 11 of the cohort were already based in the city, so for the rest they are getting to experience this fantastic city for the first time!

The orientation week began with an introduction to the course. This included a Leadership Case Study session led by Professor Randall Peterson where the class were joined by Paul McGinley, captain of the 2014 winning Ryder Cup team.

The Sloan programme is an intensive and collaborative affair. The orientation week is the first opportunity for the class to meet their study groups, with whom they will be working closely throughout the year. Bonds were formed mid-week as the study groups competed in a series of challenges around the Southbank area of the city, taking in some of London’s most famous landmarks and skyscrapers.

How best to close this busy, exciting and informative week? An incredible dinner at the world-famous Tower of London! Greeted by the Yeoman Warders (otherwise known as the Beefeaters) the class were treated to a tour and a three-course meal; a truly unique setting to end the first week of this truly unique class and programme.

Best of luck for the year ahead to the Sloan MSc class of 2017 and we look forward to following your journey!

SLN1


Can you believe the MiM, GMiM and MFA students have already started their second term at LBS? Time really does fly here on campus! Nevertheless, the end of Term One presents the perfect opportunity to look back and celebrate a few highlights from the term…

At the start of September, 321 fresh-faced Masters in Management, Global MiM and Masters in Financial Analysis students arrived at London Business School for the first day of Orientation, with the second day continuing at East Wintergarden in Canary Wharf. The students discovered more about the programme and the School through engaging presentations from speakers such as Lord Bilimoria (the chairman of Cobra Beer) and key faculty members such as Marketing Professor, Bruce Hardie and Finance Professor, Alex Edmans. MiM alumni made up a lively panel in the afternoon, sharing stories of their experiences and career journeys since graduation.

EC_Term_1_highlights_V1

A few days later, the students ventured off-campus to brave the great outdoors at Gilwell Park Activity Centre for their Away Day. The day focused on team building and problem-solving with practical activities such as raft-building and climbing. Collaboration, courage, hard work and dedication were traits that were particularly vital here!

EC_Term_1_highlights_03

EC_Term_1_highlights_V2 EC_Term_1_highlights_06

After Orientation, Foundations Week began. This included the Career Skills programme run by the Career Centre, alongside worships such as “How to Work a Room”, Business Writing, Bloomberg Skills and Excel. The learning of additional soft skills continued throughout the rest of term with additional workshops such as Business Etiquette, Impact and Influence and Financial Industry Tools sessions for the MFA (such as Morningstar, Matlab and Factset).

Core courses began after an action-packed start to the year, with the MiM and Global MiM studying Finance, Leadership in Organisations, Data Analytics for Management and Financial Accounting. Meanwhile, the MFA students covered Asset Management I, World Economy, Analysis and Financial Statements, Corporate Finance, and Data and Time Series Analytics.

The Mentoring Scheme kicked off at the end of September where students were matched with their MBA and Masters in Finance mentors, allowing students to foster meaningful relationships with more experienced professionals in our community. We went live on our Snapchat account for the #LBSMeetYourMentor evening event.

Throughout the term, our students got involved with so many activities across the student clubs. MFA students from the Impact Consulting Club volunteered for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and MiMs and MFAs took their place on the dance floor, representing their programme at the annual Diwali Party.

EC_Term_1_highlights_07 EC_Term_1_highlights_08

In early December, 62 Early Career students travelled to Silicon Valley for the Global Immersion Field Trip (GIFT). They were welcomed by companies such as Pinterest, Electronic Arts, Google, Apple, Softtech and Singularity University. This GIFT allowed students to better understand the environment which fosters such significant levels of innovation through visits to some of the best known brands in San Francisco and the Bay Area as well as smaller and mid-stage start-ups, investors, incubators, and thought leaders. You can catch more information on our student blog here

EC_Term_1_highlights_09

 

So that concludes a short overview of the first term. The students have plenty coming up for Term Two, including Business Immersion Week and Global Immersion Field Trips to Milan & Munich, Paris, Barcelona and New York! You can follow us on our Facebook page for further programme insights.