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Diversity is good for business, this much we know. Studies have shown that companies which embrace diversity have better performance, both human and financial. Seems like a no-brainer, right? In thinking about gender diversity, why is it then that we have yet to see an equal number of men and women in the boardroom, or the pay gap narrowing? There is no question that there’s work to be done to make this happen, and business schools are in a position to do so. My colleague Stephanie Thrane’s recent blog post Why we need more women in business schools sums up our role well: “As a top business school we are educating future global leaders. Leaders of large international organisations who will go on to shape the business of the future. The more women who go on to graduate from business schools the more women we are able to promote into leadership roles. The more women we have in leadership roles the more opportunities we have to change outdated c-suite norms, in-equality in pay, maternity leave policies and the list goes on.”

 

So, how as a business school can we help to build this pipeline? London Business School continues to take steps to ensure equal representation of women within the community, with initiatives including increasing the proportion of applications from female faculty shortlisted for interview for untenured positions, encouraging female applicants to apply through initiatives with the Women in Business Club and also enhanced scholarships, easier identification of classroom case studies with female protagonists, and through covering equality and diversity from day one in the classroom at Orientation.

 

It’s vital that professionals from all backgrounds and demographics engage in the conversation of gender equality, and this is a conversation in which both men and women need to be involved – they each make-up half of the world’s population, so makes sense that each is at the table. We need to discuss how gender, and the stereotyping and bias which may come along with it, affects the way in which we work, and how our perceptions of gender may positively and negatively affect our organisations.

 

And it’s not just professionals who should be taking into account these considerations. In thinking about the pipeline it’s vital that students are also engaged in this discussion. In this post, MiM2017 Lola Wajskop shares her experience in looking at the issue of gender equality in the classroom:

 

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Diversity matters. I’ve said it before and I’ll keep saying it: building and nurturing diverse teams – both in universities and in the workplace – is not only the right thing to do, it also makes business sense. I’ve been passionate about gender diversity specifically ever since I read Lean In, the first book of Sheryl Sandberg (if you haven’t read it: I strongly recommend it!). The book opened my eyes to many issues related to gender equality. Over the past few years I’ve focused on the issue of women in engineering and tech and decided to take action: before joining LBS, I launched “Yes She Can” with my friend Lola, an initiative aimed at attracting more female students into STEM education.

 

When I decided to pursue a second masters, I carefully studied the “MiM landscape”, considering which business school should I apply to? London Business School was my absolute first choice: the school had a stellar academic reputation, but I was even more attracted by its effort to build a community as diverse as possible. The school really understands that the quality of our experience is proportional to the level of diversity in the classroom – whether nationalities, backgrounds, aspirations or gender.

 

I strongly believe that business schools, and especially LBS, are major players in the fight for gender equality. The reason is simple: if we joined the MiM programme, it is because at some point in the near future we would like to manage – manage organisations, manage people, manage countries (who knows?!). This makes it very likely that a significant part of the class will aim for leadership positions during their careers. If business schools foster a culture and a community where gender equality is a high priority, where people understand and talk about why diversity matters in the workplace, it is likely that these same people – my friends – will actively seek to recreate a similar culture in the organisations that they join or create. Basically, we’ll leave the world in a better place than we found it. And LBS definitely aims to do just that.

 

Gender parity is a top priority at the faculty level (where I know it is a topic that is researched thoroughly), and on the student side, too. As an example, I was attending last week the annual “Multiple:X” conference of the Private Equity and Venture Capital Club. When I got there, I was shocked by the small number of women attending – the room was largely dominated by men, perhaps not surprising knowing that finance is one of those fields that is dominated by men. But then I realised that the students organising the event actively tried to promote equality and get women engaged in the event:
(1) the speakers and panellists included women – and I was very pleased to hear from most of my friends attending that their one favourite speaker was a woman, Zeina Bain, Managing Director at the Carlyle Group;

(2) there was a panel dedicated entirely to gender diversity in the workplace,

(3) there was a good mix of male and female presenters represented, including  my friends Stefan and Rachel, and they both did an incredible job at keeping the day going. This is just one example, but it truly represents what the school and its community stands for: we actively look to make a difference, as often as we can.

 

Another example would be the ManBassador programme. Born within the Women in Business Club, ManBassadors are a group of male students who actively pledge to support the gender equality cause. It is one of my favourite initiatives at LBS – how can a conversation about gender be useful if only women are taking part in it? My friend Jake organised a ManBassador lunch a few weeks ago, during which about 15 MiM students – men and women – discussed gender parity issues and shared experiences about. I loved it. My male friends were listening carefully, sometimes surprised by what we were telling them, sometimes angry to realise that women had to face such adversity. They shared their experiences and how gender roles are viewed in their home countries. It was an eye-opening conversation for many, and definitely a valuable experience for everyone who was there.

 

Finally, I’d like to acknowledge the incredible support of my female friends here at LBS. We know that women are stronger when they support each other, and I truly learned the importance of this support during this year. My friend Sara, for example, who is doing the Masters in Financial Analysis, is my #1 fan. When I have interviews, she jumps for joy. When I had my first job offers, she kept on telling me how proud she was and how much I deserved it. Having a strong group of strong women supporting each other is one of these things that I got from LBS and that will (hopefully) follow me during the rest of my life, and it’s a pretty invaluable gift.

 

My last point would be that LBS is an excellent platform for you to experiment and train yourself for your future career. Try, practice and jump on every occasion to build your self-confidence. Not a big fan of public speaking? Stretch yourself and share your point of view in class. Never liked taking the lead in a group? Go and take ownership of as many projects as you can in your study group. You’re here to learn, fail (sometimes) and progress (always). This is your chance to build the best version of yourself: when you leave LBS, it will be with confidence and with a crowd of incredible women cheering on you.

 

See more about Women at LBS


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At most business schools you will find similarities in the course content, the academics and the case studies used. What differs and sets them apart is the environment you study and develop in.

At London Business School it is easy to point to the key characteristics that help to define this environment; the city of London, the diversity of the classroom, the practical nature of the academics. However a key characteristic that is vitally important for Early Career students in particular is the cross-generational learning opportunities. The LBS campus is diverse, not just by nationalities but by the range of experience levels of its students. Our MBA/MIF students have on average five years of experience and our leadership (EMBA portfolio) students have on average twelve. For a small community like LBS these individuals are easily accessible and quickly become part of your network. To learn and socialise amongst them can broaden your horizons and expose you to insights and learnings that would not be easily accessible in a standard workplace.

Within the Early Career Programmes there are three key opportunities to maximise the impact of cross-generational learning:

1. Electives

Students have access to a range of elective courses whilst studying on the Early Career Programmes. Not only does this allow you to begin to specialise your knowledge but you are in the classroom with students from across our Degree Education portfolio. With a vast range of diverse experience in an elective class this presents the opportunity to gain insights and thinking for tackling problems or solving issues.

However much experience or insight an individual has, everyone is treated equal allowing for Early Careers students to have an impact and opinion on assignments and tasks. It is a mutually beneficial relationship for all involved.

2. Mentors

There are a multitude of mentorship opportunities for Early Career Students through the MBA/MiF mentoring scheme or seeking out one of the alumni mentors. Equally within the community it is common place to find mentors in clubs/societies that can guide and advise on your next career steps.

Ben Jeffery (MiM2016) met his mentor, Mark Hosking (MBA2016) through the peer leader sessions run by the Career Centre. As Ben was preparing for a career in consultancy they staged mock interviews and went through the types of questions that he would face. “I had strong analytical and quantitative skills, but wasn’t familiar with how to present ideas to interviewers at a consulting firm” says Ben.  Both Ben and his mentor now work together at BCG and Ben highlights “Having a friendly face around the office is great, if I’m not sure about something, Mark’s my first port of call.”

 3.Clubs/Societies

The clubs at LBS represent the heart of the community and provide the opportunity to engage with individuals over mutual interests and passions. They are made up of students from across the degree portfolio and cover a wide range of professional, personal and cultural interests. Being a member of a professional club and gaining industry insight from experienced students is an invaluable experience. We often hear stories of students finding their future business partners in the clubs as this is a key way to network across the full community of students.

 

London Business School actively seeks to bring in a diverse group of students to create a melting pot of ideas and views. Whilst we can influence who studies at the school, the community evolves in an organic way and provides opportunities for students to grow professionally, academically and personally. For Early Career students this community represents the first step into the business world and we actively look for those who will make a positive impact towards London Business School.

Find out more about the London Business School community


Can you believe the MiM, GMiM and MFA students have already started their second term at LBS? Time really does fly here on campus! Nevertheless, the end of Term One presents the perfect opportunity to look back and celebrate a few highlights from the term…

At the start of September, 321 fresh-faced Masters in Management, Global MiM and Masters in Financial Analysis students arrived at London Business School for the first day of Orientation, with the second day continuing at East Wintergarden in Canary Wharf. The students discovered more about the programme and the School through engaging presentations from speakers such as Lord Bilimoria (the chairman of Cobra Beer) and key faculty members such as Marketing Professor, Bruce Hardie and Finance Professor, Alex Edmans. MiM alumni made up a lively panel in the afternoon, sharing stories of their experiences and career journeys since graduation.

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A few days later, the students ventured off-campus to brave the great outdoors at Gilwell Park Activity Centre for their Away Day. The day focused on team building and problem-solving with practical activities such as raft-building and climbing. Collaboration, courage, hard work and dedication were traits that were particularly vital here!

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After Orientation, Foundations Week began. This included the Career Skills programme run by the Career Centre, alongside worships such as “How to Work a Room”, Business Writing, Bloomberg Skills and Excel. The learning of additional soft skills continued throughout the rest of term with additional workshops such as Business Etiquette, Impact and Influence and Financial Industry Tools sessions for the MFA (such as Morningstar, Matlab and Factset).

Core courses began after an action-packed start to the year, with the MiM and Global MiM studying Finance, Leadership in Organisations, Data Analytics for Management and Financial Accounting. Meanwhile, the MFA students covered Asset Management I, World Economy, Analysis and Financial Statements, Corporate Finance, and Data and Time Series Analytics.

The Mentoring Scheme kicked off at the end of September where students were matched with their MBA and Masters in Finance mentors, allowing students to foster meaningful relationships with more experienced professionals in our community. We went live on our Snapchat account for the #LBSMeetYourMentor evening event.

Throughout the term, our students got involved with so many activities across the student clubs. MFA students from the Impact Consulting Club volunteered for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and MiMs and MFAs took their place on the dance floor, representing their programme at the annual Diwali Party.

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In early December, 62 Early Career students travelled to Silicon Valley for the Global Immersion Field Trip (GIFT). They were welcomed by companies such as Pinterest, Electronic Arts, Google, Apple, Softtech and Singularity University. This GIFT allowed students to better understand the environment which fosters such significant levels of innovation through visits to some of the best known brands in San Francisco and the Bay Area as well as smaller and mid-stage start-ups, investors, incubators, and thought leaders. You can catch more information on our student blog here

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So that concludes a short overview of the first term. The students have plenty coming up for Term Two, including Business Immersion Week and Global Immersion Field Trips to Milan & Munich, Paris, Barcelona and New York! You can follow us on our Facebook page for further programme insights.


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We are pleased to announce that our Masters in Management (MiM) programme has been ranked sixth in the recent Financial Times ranking for the second year running. The programme remains number one in the UK.

We are delighted that the programme achieved a top position for ‘aims achieved’, with 93 per cent of alumni satisfied.

London Business School is ranked number one in the world for its international student body, with international students accounting for 98 per cent of the MiM class of 2015.

Leila Guerra, Executive Director, Early Career Programmes, said: “Our global diversity is extremely attractive. Our students gain a lot from the rich peer mix and a life-long, cross-generational, network of alumni worldwide. The ranking results today are a testament to this and to the exciting careers that our graduates go on to lead.” 

The average salary reported by London Business School’s 2013 MiM students was $80,526 three years after graduation, an increase of more than 9 per cent since the first ranking two years ago. 96 per cent of the class were employed within three months of graduation, based on a 98% reporting rate; one of the highest among the schools ranked.

Find more information about the programme and how to apply here.View the full Financial Times MiM ranking here.


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Applications for the Masters in Financial Analysis (MFA), the Masters in Management (MIM) and the Global Masters in Management (GMIM) starting in September 2017 are now open.

To make the process as smooth as possible, we have put together an application checklist for you to use. In order to submit a complete application, please make sure you submit the following:

  • Online application form
  • GMAT/GRE /(CFA Level 1 certificate – only applies to MFA candidates)/
  • English language certification copy (if required)
  • Essay questions
  •  Two references
  • Scanned copies of academic transcripts (MFA applicants must have studied a numerate undergraduate degree)
  • Application fee: GBP£90
  • KIRA Talent admissions video for GMIM applicants only (a new feature of the GMIM application)

We run a rolling admissions process so you can apply at any point in the cycle once you feel your application is ready and complete. We also provide recommended deadlines through the cycle so applicants can focus their efforts towards a specific date.

Once you have submitted an application, you can expect to receive an initial interview decision within three weeks. If successful and following an interview, you will receive a final decision with six to eight weeks of your initial application date.

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As you prepare your application to one of our three programmes, there are a few steps you can take to help strengthen your candidacy. As a first stage, we always recommend you submit a copy of your CV so that we can check and confirm your eligibility to apply to our programmes!Applicants to the Global MiM should apply no later than the 7th March. Chinese nationals will need to apply via Fudan University, please find details here.

Submit CV for MFA here

Submit CV for MiM here

Submit CV for GMiM here

Next, if you are planning on visiting London in the upcoming months, why not book in for a coffee chat or attend one our monthly information sessions on campus which is a great opportunity for you to meet with staff, current students and get a feel for campus life. If not, our will be running sessions across the word so please do check our events page for events near you!

Should you have any questions about our programmes, the application process or the School in general please do get in touch with the recruitment team at mfa@london.edu or mim@london.edu.

Best of luck with your application – we look forward to receiving it!

Camille Vironda


When you apply to business school, you may find yourself facing this age-old problem: how do I make my CV stand out from the competition? In 2014, our colleague Jamie Wright from the Early Career Programmes Team shared her views on how to write a winning CV which included keeping it concise, current, accurate, and gap-free. In this companion piece, let’s look at more tips helping you create a lasting impact on your readers, the Admissions Committee members.

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1. It’s also about ‘THEM’

Logic dictates that a CV would be ‘all about you’ but it’s not quite so simple. Remember that CVs are written for someone else to read so you want to take into consideration your audience’s needs and the kind of information your reader wants to find.

Member of the Admissions Committee will ask themselves:

. Are you a capable student? Do you have the academics, skills, and knowledge needed to cope with the programme?
. Will you be a successful student? Will you have the right drive to get results? Are you providing evidence of taking positions of responsibility? Are you motivated to do well?
. Will you fit in? Are you well-rounded? Are you showcasing activities that will make you a contributing team member? Do you come across as genuine?

Thinking first of your readers’ expectations will help you tailor your messaging more effectively.

2. It’s about RELEVANCE

The recruiter’s perspective is that many CVs and cover letters appear mass-produced and generic: “Students need to include information that helps to differentiate them and demonstrates their motivation.” Every CV you send should be individually tailored to its audience.

My advice is to write up a full list of all of your projects, skills, and experiences on a blueprint CV. Use this list to pick and choose which elements should feature more prominently on your final iteration (without creating time gaps or omitting important information).

Do decide which achievements are truly significant to your audience.
Is a swimming competition won as a child crucially important information? You may want to highlight more recent examples of success instead. Could a three-month, stellar extra-curricular project previously omitted from your CV actually be of interest? Always showcase your more pertinent experiences.

Universally in-demand skills, such as analytical, inter-personal, teamwork, leadership, and creativity skills should always be featured. Once you’ve assessed what the audience needs to hear, add more relevant elements based on the specific soft skills, hard knowledge, technical aptitude, and commercial awareness you possess.

Do provide actual evidence and examples. It’s never enough to say “I am a good communicator, I am a leader” on your CV; let your achievements speak for themselves instead. You want to highlight specific projects or internships within your sector of interest, examples of challenges or risks undertaken, international exposure gained, languages spoken, etc.

3. It’s about CLARITY

Did you know that many employers use scanning software to ‘read’ CVs because they receive so many applications that using human eyes would be counter-productive? Recruiters told us the “best applications are structured and succinct.” This applies to business school applications as well. Your CV should be easy to read at a quick glance to capture our human attention and keywords and achievements should pop from the page.

To achieve this, you should:

Feature measurable achievements and quantify experience: use amounts or percentages to establish targets and assess results. “Designed a social media campaign which helped increase our customer base by 8% over three months” is more effective in demonstrating accomplishments than “participated in a social media project.”

Use ‘action verbs’ to showcase your personal contributions. Don’t forget to highlight your own input, initiatives, and innovations. What did you increase, decrease, implement, produce, report, create, support or develop?Simply emphasise YOUR genuine added value and don’t just copy/paste the job description of your internship.

Keep the timeline easy to follow and the layout clean. Do use reverse chronological order (most recent first) in all sections, explain any time gaps, and give your exact internships dates. Saying you interned at Google in ‘July 2015’ is unclear: were you there for one, two, three weeks? At this level in your career, how much time has been spent in these experiences is important information. Do keep the CV layout simple: avoid photos (not needed in the UK), logos, links, and tables. Finally, do spell-check everything, from the name of your university to your email address.

Remember that your CV directly represents you as a successful student and an aspiring young professional so taking good care into crafting it will impress your audience.

Happy writing and we look forward to reading your impactful CVs!


If you have decided to submit an application to the Early Career programmes at London Business School (Masters in Management, Global Masters in Management and Masters in Financial Analysis), you may have already researched the benefits of studying here, employment opportunities and the network you will gain as a student at the School.  Once you have a strong understanding of how London Business School can help your academic, professional and personal development, it is also important to start researching your financing options. A Masters degree is a big investment in your career and future and there is a wide range of financial support available to help you both from London Business School and externally. This blog is designed to give students a better understanding of the selection criteria for London Business School scholarships.

Students accepted in the Early Career programmes at London Business School have access to two types of scholarships: merit-based and bursary scholarships.

Merit-based scholarships do not require an application and candidates will be automatically considered for these upon receiving an offer from the Admissions Committee.  When reviewing candidates for a merit-based scholarship, the Scholarship Committee takes into consideration academic, personal and professional achievements but also the strength of the application and interview for our programmes. Alongside a good academic record, strong internships and a clear focus in their career path, potential scholars will need to showcase a great deal of motivation for becoming a student at London Business School. We expect our scholars to be active members of the community and act as ambassadors of the programme and the School. This can often be demonstrated through extracurricular activities on campus in your undergraduate degree or showing through your application and interview that you have already reflected on the ways in which you can contribute to the London Business School community. Antonio from the Masters in Management (MIM) Class of 2016 is only one example of the high quality students joining our programmes every year:


Antonio_Marcelo_MIM2016“I am a Portuguese national who lived in Lisbon since birth, with the exception of a semester abroad in France.  I completed my Bachelors degree at Nova School of Business and Economics, where I have built solid foundations in economic analysis.  In parallel to my academic studies, I had a career as a gymnast, which was highlighted by the participation in two European Championships (2010 and 2012) and the 1st place in two National Championships (2009 and 2014). While my professional and academic experiences taught me the contents required to have success in the future, having the opportunity to be part of a team without equal taught me the importance of discipline, hard work, cooperation and persistence in the pursuit of the goals that one defines. Adding to this, I was a part-time Usher during my undergraduate degree at Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and a summer intern at Banco Popular and Banco Invest. While the first allowed me to develop strong communication and teamwork skills, the latter allowed me to have an understanding of the financial sector that I hope to be a highly valuable asset for my post-programme position.”


Bursary scholarships require an application and this can only be submitted once you have received an offer from the Admissions Committee at the School. In order to be reviewed for a bursary scholarship, you will need to provide information on the estimated costs of your year at London Business School and how you expect to fund your studies in the absence of a bursary award. Bursary scholarships are awarded on both financial aid and merit.

Full information on both merit-based scholarships and bursaries can be found on our website here.

London Business School encourages candidates to explore all scholarship and financing opportunities available to them in their home country or country of residence. Sources can include charitable organisations, government agencies and the local British Council Office. In addition to these independent sources of funding, candidates are able to apply to the Prodigy – London Business School Loan Scheme.

Kathleen Bell from the Financial Aid Office at London Business School has provided more information on the loan opportunities available to students in previous blogs which can be found here.


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Interviews are a key component of how we assess candidates for our degree programmes. They provide us a chance to get to know the individual and bring an application to life. At the foremost we are looking for aptitude, personality and passion.

For candidates not used to interviewing they can be a nerve-wracking process but they are an important skillset to master for anyone embarking on a professional career. In my opinion, nerves can be positive as they can help keep you engaged and alert to the questions but also indicate your ambition for progressing past the interview.

Below, I have shared five key points that you should consider when approaching interviews. They are more easily said than done, but if you can keep them in mind they will go a long way to ensuring you project the best side of yourself.

I regularly evaluate candidates for our Early Career Programmes at London Business School and these views have been formulated from the many candidates I have interviewed.  I hope having read this, you will find it useful and it can have a positive impact on your interview technique.

 

1. Be natural.

Showcase your personality. An interviewer is assessing not only your calibre for the programme but also how you will fit into the community. Engage in conversation before or after the formal assessment and show your passion and interest in what you are being interviewed for. It will put you at ease and also the answers you provide will come across as genuine. It is easy to judge when someone is not being their true self.

2. Be an open book.

Shutting yourself off and only providing short answers will leave the interviewer unsatisfied at the lack of information being provided. You want to allow the interview to flow naturally from question to question. If you cannot show learnings or achievements from your actions then the interview can turn into a back and forth that will not leave a good impression.

Be willing to share and provide insights into your experiences and ensure to link your answers back to question in hand.  If you have a particular method for formulating your answers take a breath before you start and think through where you want to start and end.

3. Stand your ground.

Don’t be afraid to stick to your convictions. Changing your viewpoint to satisfy an interviewer only showcases a lack of belief. A well-thought-out position, defended well, is more impressive than simply agreeing with a different view. However show that you can adapt to advice/feedback and be flexible in your views.

A good example is when thinking about your career goals. It is important to have aspirations and goals but if you cannot show the rationale behind them this becomes a weak rather than a strong attribute. Connect the dots between your past achievements and how these can be a barometer for your potential success. Research alternative possibilities and solutions to a challenge and consider other viewpoints to highlight your adaptability and agility to recognise that there may be alternate ways to achieve your goal.

4. Know your application and audience.

Too many times candidates have not thought about the points they have made in essays/statements. Any information you provide can be explored in an interview. It may be a minor achievement on your CV but if you haven’t thought about why and how you did something and what you achieved/learned, you may get caught out.

Equally, know and research the organisation (the school) that you are interviewing with. Show to them that you understand their vision, values and attributes. Without this knowledge you will never truly be able to demonstrate your suitability.

5. Answer the question asked.

A cardinal mistake is providing an answer for a different question. You may have thought about the key points you want to make beforehand but they don’t need to be laid down at the first chance. There will be always time across the interview to emphasis the key areas you want to put across.

I like to think of interviews like a chess game albeit one where the opposition wins. If you start off with all the moves you have very early on, it becomes easy for your opponent to break you down later in the game.  By focusing on each individual move you will be able to achieve the end result.

 

Finally, try and relax in an interview. Get a feel for the environment you are in, know your audience and ask questions at the end! Your final minutes of an interview will have a long-lasting impression and you want them to be positive.

I wish you best of luck in any future interviews.


It’s half way through the academic year and the MiM2016s are already in the midst of their second term. Last week, the campus was very quiet as the students were busy travelling the streets of London to visit a whole host of global companies during Business Immersion Week. The week allowed the students to gain invaluable insights into the different industries, learning the ways in which companies operate and gaining an insight into the company culture.

The visits gave the Masters in Management students a tour of the company offices, and an opportunity to network with business leaders. Some of the companies involved this year were: Accenture, A.T. Kearney, BBC Worldwide, Ernst & Young, Google, KPMG, London Stock Exchange, Medallia, M&C Saatchi, Prophet, Pizza Rossa, Santander, WeWork, Unilever and Universal Music.

The LBS Incubator also offered an Entrepreneurial Insights session, inviting back LBS alumni who had founded their own companies to speak to their students about their journey post MiM and their experiences of launching a start-up. Former General Manager and Vice President of Apple Europe, Pascal Cagni also shared his experiences of entrepreneurship, through the eyes of his venture investor company, C4 Ventures.

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Learning outside the lecture theatre is an integral part of the programme and the week certainly offered a first-hand, practical experience for the students.

Martigny, Oriana

“By visiting Universal Music Group, I finally felt like I was understanding what was going on behind the scenes. I always wondered how the music industry precisely works and the company presentations brought exactly the answers I was looking for. They made clear all revenue streams and highlighted current challenges of working in an industry so greatly affected by the digital revolution.” Oriana Martigny

Szabo, Akos

 

“Visiting Prophet was a really cool experience to see a brand consultancy in all its glory. They showed us around the office and gave a short presentation about what they did. In order to experience the job in practice, we even had a mini case competition, with the winning team getting a special prize. Once the session was over we got to join the company for their Friday afternoon routine and networked alongside a couple of beers. I would do it all over again!”  Akos Szabo

 

Patel, Chandni

“Being able to spend an entire day at the Lothar Böhm office was extremely insightful. I was able to experience work in a brand consulting firm first hand, interact with the employees of the company on an informal basis and figure out whether I could really see myself working there. We had a chance to do a live case with the company and get feedback on our recommendations from the top management. Business Immersion Week really adds a special touch to the MiM programme and broadens our understanding of different industries.”  Chandni Patel

 

 

Watch the Business Immersion Week video. Learn more about our Early Career Programmes and contact the Recruitment Team mim@london.edu or mfa@london.edu.

 


Global recruiters recognise our Masters in Management (MiM) graduates as those capable of hitting the ground running with the skills and mind-set to take on the challenges of the fast-moving business world.

By choosing our MiM, you’ll gain a rigorous and analytical understanding in the techniques and frameworks of general management enhanced by a series of Global Immersion Field Trips (GIFTs), peers from over 140 countries and real-world experience and insight from our international renowned faculty.

We asked four MiM ambassadors why they chose London Business School.

 

Anushka Doshi

Anushka Doshi

“I set my eyes on London Business School at an event in Boston during my sophomore year when I heard numerous faculty and alumni speak about their experiences at LBS.  I was also fortunate enough to be mentored by an entrepreneurship professor at Babson College who is an LBS alum and spoke to me about the merits of the school, the fabulous network and esteemed faculty. I look forward to hearing multiple languages while walking around campus but also sharing the same ethos and speaking the same ‘language’ when it comes to our commitment towards business in the classroom and otherwise – whichever sector we choose to join post MiM!” 

 

 

Ben Jeffery

Ben Jeffery “I think it is safe to assume that everyone doing a MiM is an ambitious person, and ambitious people will always strive for the pinnacle of their focus. It goes without saying LBS has a fantastic reputation globally and is ranked amongst the best business schools in the world.  I also happen to have three LBS MBA alumni in my extended family, and after picking their brains about my options and their respective careers they left me in no doubt that LBS was THE place to apply to.

There is a huge range of nationalities and cultures within the current class (51 different countries) as well as an eclectic mix of academic and professional backgrounds. This presents a very exciting opportunity to share our experiences and build lasting professional and personal relationships.”

 

Nuria Riechenberg 

Nuria Riechenberg

“I was born in the small country of Luxembourg, raised by a German father and a Spanish mother. I pursued my undergraduate studies in Economics at the University of Pennsylvania in the United States but I soon realised that America also wasn’t quite able to fully satisfy my cultural appetite, so I soon decided to add an Asian language to the mix, leading me to study Japanese and spend a year in Japan. After graduation, I interned at the German Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Tokyo and then moving to probably the most globally representative body in this world: The United Nations in New York. The main reason I chose London Business School over other graduate options is for its global student and faculty body.

What I am looking forward to is a year of late-night study sessions, brooding over pages of complicated assignments and problem sets with the best and brightest of peers. World-class teaching on all the business subjects that I know still nothing of. An international journey that spans the cities of London, Shanghai, Mumbai, Paris and many more. A corporate network that includes the most forward-looking, dynamic and sustainable businesses that tackle the pressing global challenges of the day. And last but definitely not least, the greatest group of friends and class mates this world has to offer.”

 

Zi (Cara) Ge

Cara Ge“London Business School stands out as the best platform to achieve my career goal, with its rich portfolio of practice-oriented faculty and diverse student pool specialising in so many different industries. I believe London is the place where I can have it all, to keep in touch with any time zone and follow each ongoing market; which hopefully can make me stay vigilant towards the business world as a whole, (while sometimes it also means horribly long working hours for investment bankers).”

 

 

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Nicoleta!