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Summer is the time of changes in the world of admissions. On Friday 14 July we said goodbye to the MBA2017 class who had their official congregation ceremony at the Royal Festival Hall in London. It was a bitter sweet day. On one hand we celebrated the success of the MBA2017 class who have completed their MBA and are about to embark on new and exciting adventures all around the world; on the other hand we also had to send them our farewells as we’ll no longer bump into them on campus. We will definitely miss that! It’s been two years since we first welcomed the class on campus at their official Orientation day and it has been an incredible two years watching them go through their transformational MBA journey. This class has had a real positive impact on the LBS community and it is hard to only mention a few reasons why they are such a great bunch. BUT my two favorite highlights from this class has been its take on inclusion and diversity.

The Women in Business Club officially launched the Man-bassador scheme which aims to encourage both men and women to openly discuss issues regarding gender diversity. The scheme has created opportunities for all students to learn how to be a successful male ally, and promote the message of equality to fellow students. This very important initiative from the Women in Business Club will be carried over to this year’s presidents who are continuing to build bridges and include allies in the discussion. Speaking of diversity and inclusion, the MBA2017 class has also been instrumental in propelling the Out in Business Club. Their mission is to raise awareness of the LGBT+ community, promote diversity and facilitate interaction between its members and other LGBT+ business networks. Last year the club organised the biggest ever EurOut conference, attracting more than 200 students from 45 leading global business schools and universities and speakers from BCG (the event’s lead sponsor), McKinsey, Cisco, Google, KPMG, Telegraph Group and Mishcon de Reya just to name a few. It has been an incredible experience watching the Out in Business club grow both in size and presence (the intake of openly LGBT+ students at LBS has more than trebled since 2010) and I am confident that the club will continue to make a positive contribution not only to LBS, but to the wider community as well.

The MBA2017 class have of course been involved in many, many more activites and causes, and these are just a couple of my personal highlights. So while we say goodbye to an amazing class, we are also saying hello to a brand new MBA class,  something we in admissions are really excited about! We have been working with the new class since our first application deadline in September and in just a few weeks we welcome all 430 of them on campus. The new class will be as diverse as previous MBA classes, with students from over 70 different nationalities and of course from a variety of different professional backgrounds.

I was privileged to meet some of the new members of the MBA2019 class last month when I went to the annual Forte Foundation conference. At London Business School we invite our Forte Scholarship recipients to join the conference and this year we had four of our MBA2019 admits attending. Inspirational as always, this year the conference was hosted by Amazon in their home town of Seattle, Washington. Whether it was Amazon, the amazing line-up of speakers or the Forte Foundation’s amazing brand, this year’s conference ended up completely sold out! It was attended by more than 600 incoming or current MBA women from over 40 different schools in North America and Europe.  Four of those 600 attendees are starting their MBA at LBS in just a few weeks:

-          Sherry, a brand manager for Clif Bar in California and a wine enthusiast. Enthusiast is actually a real understatement, Sherry has not only worked in vineyards in Napa, she is also named after two wines…Sherry Rose. Sherry’s marketing experience will be extremely valuable for her classmates at LBS, but so will her experience in wine, particularly in the Wine and Spirits club!

- Neressa is a scientist at BioMarin Pharmaceiticals Inc, a biotechnology company which focuses on treatments for rare genetic diseases that mostly affect children. Neressa’s unique science background in a very male-dominated world will provide different perspectives to the classroom discussions. Neressa will bring a completely unique set of skills to her class.

-          Elsa, a finance major who started her career on the trading floor, but later moved into retail in merchandice planning at Macy’s in New York. She is also a keen football player which she will have plenty of opportunities to pursue in the UK.

And finally we were also joined by Shannon, a Boeing engineer specifically in charge of  designing the galleys on 737 air crafts. As part of my trip to Seattle I went to visit Boeing and now fully appreciate the immense complexity of Shannon’s work in designing and building air crafts. So there they are, four women from the MBA2019 class at London Business School each bringing a unique and diverse perspective to their new community. As part of my job I have read most of the applications from the new class and I can tell you that Sherry, Neressa, Elsa and Shannon will be joining a great group of unique and diverse individuals.

So while we were sad to say goodbye to the MBA2017s we also celebrated their achievements and we look forward to welcome the new group of MBAs who are all keen to make an impact on the LBS community.

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Inventor of the web Tim Berners-Lee famously said, “We need diversity of thought in the world to face the new challenges”.  An eclectic mix of factors such as gender, ethnicity and experience can encourage the kind of cognitive diversity Berners-Lee meant.

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There are 195 countries in the world today. Before joining London Business School (LBS), current students across all of our programmes studied in 80 of them.

The School’s ever-growing footprint in London and its Dubai campus allows LBS to welcome more students – 2,177 and counting – than ever before.

Ideas are powered by diversity. Nearly 120 nationalities are represented across our programmes, with each student bringing unique world views, experiences and insights. Our graduates leave LBS with broadened horizons and they have a direct impact on the way the world does business.

Our community embraces diversity

Around a third of our current students are women. LBS’s Dean, Professor Sir Andrew Likierman, says: “We are committed to ensuring generations of women leaders flourish throughout their careers, right across the globe.” Learn more about women at LBS here

There has been much talk of Brexit and whether the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union will impact the School’s ability to attract the brightest minds from all corners of the world. In this film, Sir Andrew said he had been reassured that our students are the kinds of people whom officials want to stay in the UK. As a global school we’ll continue to celebrate our richly diverse community.

So, what makes LBS diverse? Our multicultural students. Just as our students thrive on learning from different perspectives, the global business community thrives on the diversity of thought for which our students are known.


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Diversity is good for business, this much we know. Studies have shown that companies which embrace diversity have better performance, both human and financial. Seems like a no-brainer, right? In thinking about gender diversity, why is it then that we have yet to see an equal number of men and women in the boardroom, or the pay gap narrowing? There is no question that there’s work to be done to make this happen, and business schools are in a position to do so. My colleague Stephanie Thrane’s recent blog post Why we need more women in business schools sums up our role well: “As a top business school we are educating future global leaders. Leaders of large international organisations who will go on to shape the business of the future. The more women who go on to graduate from business schools the more women we are able to promote into leadership roles. The more women we have in leadership roles the more opportunities we have to change outdated c-suite norms, in-equality in pay, maternity leave policies and the list goes on.”

 

So, how as a business school can we help to build this pipeline? London Business School continues to take steps to ensure equal representation of women within the community, with initiatives including increasing the proportion of applications from female faculty shortlisted for interview for untenured positions, encouraging female applicants to apply through initiatives with the Women in Business Club and also enhanced scholarships, easier identification of classroom case studies with female protagonists, and through covering equality and diversity from day one in the classroom at Orientation.

 

It’s vital that professionals from all backgrounds and demographics engage in the conversation of gender equality, and this is a conversation in which both men and women need to be involved – they each make-up half of the world’s population, so makes sense that each is at the table. We need to discuss how gender, and the stereotyping and bias which may come along with it, affects the way in which we work, and how our perceptions of gender may positively and negatively affect our organisations.

 

And it’s not just professionals who should be taking into account these considerations. In thinking about the pipeline it’s vital that students are also engaged in this discussion. In this post, MiM2017 Lola Wajskop shares her experience in looking at the issue of gender equality in the classroom:

 

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Diversity matters. I’ve said it before and I’ll keep saying it: building and nurturing diverse teams – both in universities and in the workplace – is not only the right thing to do, it also makes business sense. I’ve been passionate about gender diversity specifically ever since I read Lean In, the first book of Sheryl Sandberg (if you haven’t read it: I strongly recommend it!). The book opened my eyes to many issues related to gender equality. Over the past few years I’ve focused on the issue of women in engineering and tech and decided to take action: before joining LBS, I launched “Yes She Can” with my friend Lola, an initiative aimed at attracting more female students into STEM education.

 

When I decided to pursue a second masters, I carefully studied the “MiM landscape”, considering which business school should I apply to? London Business School was my absolute first choice: the school had a stellar academic reputation, but I was even more attracted by its effort to build a community as diverse as possible. The school really understands that the quality of our experience is proportional to the level of diversity in the classroom – whether nationalities, backgrounds, aspirations or gender.

 

I strongly believe that business schools, and especially LBS, are major players in the fight for gender equality. The reason is simple: if we joined the MiM programme, it is because at some point in the near future we would like to manage – manage organisations, manage people, manage countries (who knows?!). This makes it very likely that a significant part of the class will aim for leadership positions during their careers. If business schools foster a culture and a community where gender equality is a high priority, where people understand and talk about why diversity matters in the workplace, it is likely that these same people – my friends – will actively seek to recreate a similar culture in the organisations that they join or create. Basically, we’ll leave the world in a better place than we found it. And LBS definitely aims to do just that.

 

Gender parity is a top priority at the faculty level (where I know it is a topic that is researched thoroughly), and on the student side, too. As an example, I was attending last week the annual “Multiple:X” conference of the Private Equity and Venture Capital Club. When I got there, I was shocked by the small number of women attending – the room was largely dominated by men, perhaps not surprising knowing that finance is one of those fields that is dominated by men. But then I realised that the students organising the event actively tried to promote equality and get women engaged in the event:
(1) the speakers and panellists included women – and I was very pleased to hear from most of my friends attending that their one favourite speaker was a woman, Zeina Bain, Managing Director at the Carlyle Group;

(2) there was a panel dedicated entirely to gender diversity in the workplace,

(3) there was a good mix of male and female presenters represented, including  my friends Stefan and Rachel, and they both did an incredible job at keeping the day going. This is just one example, but it truly represents what the school and its community stands for: we actively look to make a difference, as often as we can.

 

Another example would be the ManBassador programme. Born within the Women in Business Club, ManBassadors are a group of male students who actively pledge to support the gender equality cause. It is one of my favourite initiatives at LBS – how can a conversation about gender be useful if only women are taking part in it? My friend Jake organised a ManBassador lunch a few weeks ago, during which about 15 MiM students – men and women – discussed gender parity issues and shared experiences about. I loved it. My male friends were listening carefully, sometimes surprised by what we were telling them, sometimes angry to realise that women had to face such adversity. They shared their experiences and how gender roles are viewed in their home countries. It was an eye-opening conversation for many, and definitely a valuable experience for everyone who was there.

 

Finally, I’d like to acknowledge the incredible support of my female friends here at LBS. We know that women are stronger when they support each other, and I truly learned the importance of this support during this year. My friend Sara, for example, who is doing the Masters in Financial Analysis, is my #1 fan. When I have interviews, she jumps for joy. When I had my first job offers, she kept on telling me how proud she was and how much I deserved it. Having a strong group of strong women supporting each other is one of these things that I got from LBS and that will (hopefully) follow me during the rest of my life, and it’s a pretty invaluable gift.

 

My last point would be that LBS is an excellent platform for you to experiment and train yourself for your future career. Try, practice and jump on every occasion to build your self-confidence. Not a big fan of public speaking? Stretch yourself and share your point of view in class. Never liked taking the lead in a group? Go and take ownership of as many projects as you can in your study group. You’re here to learn, fail (sometimes) and progress (always). This is your chance to build the best version of yourself: when you leave LBS, it will be with confidence and with a crowd of incredible women cheering on you.

 

See more about Women at LBS


Ignite your entrepreneurial spirit

Do you have ambitions of developing your own business venture? If you have between seven and 22 years of experience and a strong professional track record why not consider our Executive MBA (EMBA) programme. By choosing to study your EMBA at London Business School, you will benefit from a range of services and facilities specially designed to develop and expand your entrepreneurial perspective.

The Entrepreneurship Summer School gives you the chance to assess and shape your business opportunity in a robust and practical way. This programme aims to help you to succeed as an entrepreneur by providing you with the skills you need to choose which business opportunities to pursue and how to develop those ideas into workable businesses.

The LBS Incubator programme supports a selected number of graduating students and recent graduates to use the School’s facilities to launch your business. Zipporah Gatiti, Founder of Taste of Kenya credits the Incubator for offering almost everything a new business needs, as well as a mentorship programme that goes above and beyond: “If having a mentor was the only thing I’d received, it would have been worth it. Mentors are like co-founders. They study your company, help keep you on track and hold you accountable.”

There are many opportunities to learn from the professionals, the Entrepreneurship Mentor in Residence Programme provides the chance for students to learn from expert entrepreneur mentors from a range of sectors and disciplines. The famous TELL Series also showcases successful entrepreneurs’ personal stories.

Navin Valrani studied the EMBA Dubai programme and the two years changed his life and career forever. “It was wonderful in so many aspects,” he says. “First of all, the knowledge that you pick up on the EMBA gives you a fantastic toolkit to work with. You’re exposed to the most outstanding faculty you could possibly come across, and you can socialise with them after class and have some really good informal discussions. I am where I am today in my life, and with the growth rates of the businesses that I lead, because of LBS.”

Lidia Chmel decided it was time for a change of company, function and industry and founded her own company, Mama’s Dream Club. She says “I would never have had the courage to start my own company without the EMBA programme. Exploring case studies and hearing from guest speakers who had founded their own companies showed me that it was eminently possible to change direction and still be successful.”

The LBS Entrepreneurship Club provides a forum for students to network and share ideas and an environment which fosters innovation and entrepreneurship and helps students to cultivate and develop their own ideas.

Heather Baker, Founder & CEO, Top Line Comms says of her EMBA experience “The EMBA has been an exceptional experience, both personally and professionally. I am far more confident and analytical in the way I approach business development now, so much so that the company has doubled in size over the last 18 months. I’m not originally from London, so for me, making new contacts with the local business community has been just as vital as linking to the huge global network the School offers.” 

If you are thinking about how you’ll finance your venture, we have relationships with Sussex Place Ventures and Enterprise 100, who have been fundamental in helping new start-ups. Students also have the opportunity to pitch their ideas before investors and benchmark their plans against those from other schools. Competitions include, European Business Plan of the Year Competition, Venture Capital Investment Competitions and Global Social Venture Competition. See further information about Competitions.

Start your entrepreneurial journey at LBS. The next deadline for the class starting this autumn is Tuesday 2 May. See further information on applying to the programme.

 

 


I once read that one of the reasons women should undertake an MBA programme was because the alleged “bro-ski” or fraternity culture of business school prepares you for the male executive suite. On one hand I understand the argument. If you are surrounded by this type of culture for a couple of years you may very well grow a thick skin, handle critique better, become less emotional. All the stereotypes we associate men with and assume women don’t have or can’t handle (I don’t necessarily think this is true, but for the sake of this argument I am going to make general assumptions). On the other hand the statement implies that executive suites are always going to be dominated by men, and in order for women, to be successful they should conform to the male-like norms of the C-suite.

The assumption that all business schools have a cut-throat, ruthless environment is wrong. In fact, I would argue it is the exact opposite at London Business School.  Our global community with nationalities from over  130 different countries creates an environment where different perspectives are a crucial part of the learning. In order to be successful at London Business School you will need to respect the collaborative nature of the school by building bridges rather than competing with your peers. I can say with confidence that the entire school community is collaborative, open-minded and inclusive. When you meet alumni or current students of the school they would be able to confirm this statement. We don’t believe that women should go to business school so they can “do business like a man… with men” I doubt that would go down well with most women. Instead women, just like men should pursue an MBA programme because they want to invest in themselves, their personal development, their career and lifelong network. However, women who are pursuing MBA programmes also have certain opportunities to change the c-suite and make a positive impact on gender equality.
It’s been said many times that business schools play an important role in creating the pipeline of  women leaders. I couldn’t agree more. As a top business school we are educating future global leaders. Leaders of large international organisations who will go on to shape the business of the future. The more women who go on to graduate from business schools the more women we are able to promote into leadership roles. The more women we have in leadership roles the more opportunities we have to change outdated c-suite norms, in-equality in pay, maternity leave policies and the list goes on. Don’t get me wrong, I am not implying that business schools are a single solution, but it can act as a very powerful and important catalyst.

I am very proud to work at a world-leading institution where promoting women in business is high on the agenda.  Our faculty are producing great research on the topic of gender in-equality, we have a prominent student-led Women in Business club, the School is a long-time member of the Forte Foundation and we have recently launched our own “Manbassador scheme” asking men to pledge their support to gender parity. Just last weekend our team hosted the annual Women in Business Weekend for future women on the MBA programme. We welcomed a group of MBA candidates to join us in London for a weekend of faculty lectures, sightseeing in London, afternoon tea (we are in London after all) and to participate in our 17th annual Women in Business Conference.

These are just some examples of the many activities we do every year as a school to promote women inbusiness. We are making good progress as a school by educating more and more women and bringing them into senior positions once they graduate, but we still have a way to go. Being part of the MBA recruitment & admissions team, I and the rest of our team are responsible for bringing in talented and ambitious women who are going to shape the future of leadership. It’s one of my favourite parts of the job. It creates an enormous sense of purpose knowing that we are part of helping someone achieve their goals in life, but also helping to foster positive change in gender in-equality. I have a very special interest in bringing more women to business school as I sit on the School Advisory Council for the Forte Foundation and also chair its European School Advisory group. Through the School’s work with the Forte Foundation we collaborate with major corporations, other top business schools and influential non-profit organisations to direct talented women towards leadership roles in business.
I care deeply about this cultural shift and I look forward to continuing our work as change agents not only at London Business School, but across other schools and organisations.

#BeBoldForChange

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When it comes to attracting talented workers, London is the city to beat. A report carried out by professional services firm Deloitte describes England’s capital as being “in a league of its own”, having seen a 16% rise in highly-skilled people from 2013 to 2016.

In that time, the number of talented workers moving to London rose by 235,000 to 1.7 million – higher than the 1.1 million people who relocated to New York during the same period.

There is a caveat: the report was done in March 2016, three months before the British people voted to leave the EU. Will Brexit affect London’s ability to attract highly skilled workers? No one knows at this stage, but the UK government’s message is clear: Britain is open for business and skilled workers are, as always, welcome.

Whatever happens in the coming months and years, we should feel confident that London will retain its position as one of the world’s leading business and financial centres. The city has a history of handling adversity, be it the global financial crisis of 2008 or recessions in the 1980s and 1990s, and Brexit is just another challenge to overcome.

Looking to the future, industries such as digital – which grew 32% faster than the wider UK economy from 2011 to 2014 – professional services, finance, IT, engineering and medical will continue to rely on talented people.

If anything, demand for skilled people in some sectors has never been greater. Take manufacturing, where three quarters of companies struggled to find the right employees between 2013 and 2016. An industry report by business group EEF found that the industry was suffering a skills shortage. Similarly, engineering companies are struggling to find talented people for an industry that contributes about £280 billion to the British economy.

The figures highlight a trend: that London has always relied on skilled workers, be they British or otherwise – and that will never change.

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Can you believe the MiM, GMiM and MFA students have already started their second term at LBS? Time really does fly here on campus! Nevertheless, the end of Term One presents the perfect opportunity to look back and celebrate a few highlights from the term…

At the start of September, 321 fresh-faced Masters in Management, Global MiM and Masters in Financial Analysis students arrived at London Business School for the first day of Orientation, with the second day continuing at East Wintergarden in Canary Wharf. The students discovered more about the programme and the School through engaging presentations from speakers such as Lord Bilimoria (the chairman of Cobra Beer) and key faculty members such as Marketing Professor, Bruce Hardie and Finance Professor, Alex Edmans. MiM alumni made up a lively panel in the afternoon, sharing stories of their experiences and career journeys since graduation.

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A few days later, the students ventured off-campus to brave the great outdoors at Gilwell Park Activity Centre for their Away Day. The day focused on team building and problem-solving with practical activities such as raft-building and climbing. Collaboration, courage, hard work and dedication were traits that were particularly vital here!

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After Orientation, Foundations Week began. This included the Career Skills programme run by the Career Centre, alongside worships such as “How to Work a Room”, Business Writing, Bloomberg Skills and Excel. The learning of additional soft skills continued throughout the rest of term with additional workshops such as Business Etiquette, Impact and Influence and Financial Industry Tools sessions for the MFA (such as Morningstar, Matlab and Factset).

Core courses began after an action-packed start to the year, with the MiM and Global MiM studying Finance, Leadership in Organisations, Data Analytics for Management and Financial Accounting. Meanwhile, the MFA students covered Asset Management I, World Economy, Analysis and Financial Statements, Corporate Finance, and Data and Time Series Analytics.

The Mentoring Scheme kicked off at the end of September where students were matched with their MBA and Masters in Finance mentors, allowing students to foster meaningful relationships with more experienced professionals in our community. We went live on our Snapchat account for the #LBSMeetYourMentor evening event.

Throughout the term, our students got involved with so many activities across the student clubs. MFA students from the Impact Consulting Club volunteered for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and MiMs and MFAs took their place on the dance floor, representing their programme at the annual Diwali Party.

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In early December, 62 Early Career students travelled to Silicon Valley for the Global Immersion Field Trip (GIFT). They were welcomed by companies such as Pinterest, Electronic Arts, Google, Apple, Softtech and Singularity University. This GIFT allowed students to better understand the environment which fosters such significant levels of innovation through visits to some of the best known brands in San Francisco and the Bay Area as well as smaller and mid-stage start-ups, investors, incubators, and thought leaders. You can catch more information on our student blog here

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So that concludes a short overview of the first term. The students have plenty coming up for Term Two, including Business Immersion Week and Global Immersion Field Trips to Milan & Munich, Paris, Barcelona and New York! You can follow us on our Facebook page for further programme insights.


On top of all the experience you bring to the classroom via debates and group assignments, you also have a unique opportunity to shape a large part of your time at London Business School by joining a student club and organising engaging events and initiatives. The purposes of these events vary depending on the Club and its objectives, however generally they are designed to;

  • Help students learn more about a particular sector, geographical area or topic.
  • Provide networking opportunities across all programmes, with Alumni and also with other professionals working in London.
  • Enable the students organising these events to practice valuable leadership skills whilst also contributing to the School community.

There is a fantastic range of activities that happen at the school on a regular basis; last year alone (2015/2016) we had 505 guest speakers at student-led events. The events below give you a taste of the quality and variety of events held at the school.  These all occurred during the first term of the 2016/17 academic year.

1. IMPACTathon ( Impact Consulting Club) Now in its second year the IMPACTathon is an innovative take on the Hackathon format; instead of building a new business over a weekend, students help real life social entrepreneurs to develop a particular aspect of their business. This is a fairly small event with only 48 students participating but it is extremely rewarding for them to work with real businesses that are truly trying to make a difference in society. Students are able to utilise their years of experience as well as putting into action the theories they learn in the classroom. The impact this event has on the social enterprises and how they operate is invaluable.

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The winning team from the 2nd annual IMPACTathon – The Helpful Clinic

2. Global Energy Summit (Energy Club) The 13th Global energy Summit looked at ‘Where are the opportunities in Energy? The event was sponsored by The Boston Consulting Group as well as ATKearney and took place at Hilton London Tower Bridge. The impressive line-up of speakers included experienced professionals from companies such as Statoil, Petrobras and EDF.  One of the speakers was current LBS Sloan Fellow Ghassan Mirdad who has over 20 years of experience with Schlumberger. The conference is always a great opportunity to connect with professionals working in London. Non-LBS attendees at the event represented companies such as Shell, Bloomberg and Infosys. sa_dec2016_02

 Enthusiastic participants at the 13th   Global Energy Summit

3. Diwali Party (India Club) One of the biggest parties of the year with over 700 guests, this annual celebration to mark the Hindu festival of lights has achieved legendary status amongst LBS students past and present. The LBS India Club brought everyone together in kurtas and sarees, with an ample supply of delicious food for a night of celebration. The centre piece of the evening as always was the eagerly contested Inter-stream Bollywood dance-off. The MBA2018 Stream D Team came out on top as overall winners with a well-choreographed routine. sa_dec2016_03

LBS Students performing at the 2016 Diwali Party

4. EurOUT (Out in Business Club) EurOUT is one of the schools most highly rated events and Europe’s leading LGBT conference for graduate students, MBAs, PhDs and alumni from top business schools. The team did not disappoint in November 2016, they brought together an impressive line-up of speakers including Xavier Bettel (the Prime Minister of Luxembourg).  The conference also received some excellent media coverage with articles in The TelegraphGayStarNews and Vogue Mexico. You can also check out some of the reactions from speakers and attendees of the event via the event hashtag:  #EurOUT2016 sa_dec2016_04

Prime Minister of Luxembourg Xavier Bettel addressing The EurOUT 2016 Conference

5. Global Healthcare Club Conference (Healthcare Club) The theme for this 8th edition of the annual Global Healthcare Club Conference was “Precision Medicine: The Future of Medical Care” and covered cutting edge topics such as ‘How is the UK preparing itself to lead the precision medicine industry?’  and “How are genomics and digital advancement changing the landscape of precision medicine?” It was a highly engaging event with expert speakers and a great example of a niche area where students were able to increase their knowledge by attending an event organised by their peers. sa_dec2016_05

Sir Andrew Likierman Dean of London Business School with Helene Kadjar MBA2017 Student & Co-Chair of the Global Healthcare Club Conference 2016

6. LBS Hackathon (Entrepreneurship Club) Now in its 3rd successful year, the LBS Hackathon has firmly established itself as part of the School’s entrepreneurship ecosystem. Merchant Bot took home the 1st place with a slight edge over Skilltree who came second (big shout out). On the FinTech front, Team Bonsai did an impressive prototype aiming to eliminate bond issuance process from the large investment banks – however Merx won over the judges with higher scores in market validation. Praise from this year’s participants included: “Really can’t imagine a more personal and professional development-oriented 48 hours than what LBS Hackathon offered” and  “The organisation of the event was absolutely fantastic in enabling all participants to fully enjoy both the useful social interactions with new and talented people and the exciting and spirited competition”  sa_dec2016_06

LBS Hackathon participants receiving a briefing from the student organisers

For more information or to attend one of these events please visit the School’s Student-led Conferences page, which has details of all the upcoming events open to the general public.


If any of you who are international students or potential students, thinking about or worrying about getting jobs after your studies I thought that this little post about visa options might help.

I know that 2016 has been a significant year of change especially for international students in the UK. It is not all bad news though.

The UK government’s immigration policies are supportive of graduates of UK business schools and universities and most importantly the UK Government is committed to helping the brightest and the best make a contribution to the British economy which of course is great for graduates of London Business School (LBS) as you are just that.

There are lots of options available to international students who want to stay and work in the UK after their studies although not as flexible as in the past.

Below are the three most common visa schemes available to international students: Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 5.

There are many more which I will try to post about in more detail throughout next year, but for now take a look at these:

Tier 2 (General)

Overview:  This is the main immigration route to work in the UK. The visa is linked to a specific job and employer.

Is Sponsorship required?  Yes, from the Tier 2 licensed employer.

What is the Maximum duration of stay permitted?  5 years.

Can I switch from Tier 4 inside the UK?  Yes, and there are benefits of doing so. As a recent UK graduate on a Tier 4 visa, you qualify for an exemption from the Resident Labour Market Test. This makes things much easier for Employers to sponsor our alumni on a Tier 2 visa and offer them post-study job opportunities.

What do I need to qualify for this visa type? Sponsorship is in the form of a COS from a Tier 2 licensed employer. The job needs to meet various requirements including a minimum salary.

Tier 1 (Graduate Entrepreneur)

Overview:  London Business School endorses up to 20 Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Visas each year. This visa is aimed at students who complete their degree in the UK and wish to stay to develop a business plan or entrepreneurial idea.

Is Sponsorship required?  No, but there must be an endorsement from LBS.

What is the Maximum duration of stay permitted?  12 months with the possibility of renewal for a further 12 months.

Can I switch from Tier 4 inside the UK?  Yes, and you will also be able to switch to Tier 2 from this category if you find a sponsor later down the line.

What do I need to qualify for this visa type?  Your final transcript following completion of your course, endorsement letter from LBS and maintenance requirements.

Tier 5 Youth Mobility

Overview:  For individuals of certain nationalities including Australia, Canada, Japan, Monaco, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan and New Zealand aged between 18-30.

Is Sponsorship required?  Yes but only for certain countries.

What is the Maximum duration of stay permitted?  24 months

Can I switch from Tier 4 inside the UK?  No, unfortunately you can’t, you will need to make the application from back home.

What do I need to qualify for this visa type? A certificate of sponsorship is required for nationals of Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea and Taiwan. Other requirements include maintenance.

 

Below are some very good links that have much more information and helpful advice.

I hope this has made anyone who was worried about the limited options for working feel a bit better about the visa  that are out there for you.

Please contact me via email visas@london.edu with any further questions you may have.


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We are pleased to announce that our Masters in Management (MiM) programme has been ranked sixth in the recent Financial Times ranking for the second year running. The programme remains number one in the UK.

We are delighted that the programme achieved a top position for ‘aims achieved’, with 93 per cent of alumni satisfied.

London Business School is ranked number one in the world for its international student body, with international students accounting for 98 per cent of the MiM class of 2015.

Leila Guerra, Executive Director, Early Career Programmes, said: “Our global diversity is extremely attractive. Our students gain a lot from the rich peer mix and a life-long, cross-generational, network of alumni worldwide. The ranking results today are a testament to this and to the exciting careers that our graduates go on to lead.” 

The average salary reported by London Business School’s 2013 MiM students was $80,526 three years after graduation, an increase of more than 9 per cent since the first ranking two years ago. 96 per cent of the class were employed within three months of graduation, based on a 98% reporting rate; one of the highest among the schools ranked.

Find more information about the programme and how to apply here.View the full Financial Times MiM ranking here.