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Summer is the time of changes in the world of admissions. On Friday 14 July we said goodbye to the MBA2017 class who had their official congregation ceremony at the Royal Festival Hall in London. It was a bitter sweet day. On one hand we celebrated the success of the MBA2017 class who have completed their MBA and are about to embark on new and exciting adventures all around the world; on the other hand we also had to send them our farewells as we’ll no longer bump into them on campus. We will definitely miss that! It’s been two years since we first welcomed the class on campus at their official Orientation day and it has been an incredible two years watching them go through their transformational MBA journey. This class has had a real positive impact on the LBS community and it is hard to only mention a few reasons why they are such a great bunch. BUT my two favorite highlights from this class has been its take on inclusion and diversity.

The Women in Business Club officially launched the Man-bassador scheme which aims to encourage both men and women to openly discuss issues regarding gender diversity. The scheme has created opportunities for all students to learn how to be a successful male ally, and promote the message of equality to fellow students. This very important initiative from the Women in Business Club will be carried over to this year’s presidents who are continuing to build bridges and include allies in the discussion. Speaking of diversity and inclusion, the MBA2017 class has also been instrumental in propelling the Out in Business Club. Their mission is to raise awareness of the LGBT+ community, promote diversity and facilitate interaction between its members and other LGBT+ business networks. Last year the club organised the biggest ever EurOut conference, attracting more than 200 students from 45 leading global business schools and universities and speakers from BCG (the event’s lead sponsor), McKinsey, Cisco, Google, KPMG, Telegraph Group and Mishcon de Reya just to name a few. It has been an incredible experience watching the Out in Business club grow both in size and presence (the intake of openly LGBT+ students at LBS has more than trebled since 2010) and I am confident that the club will continue to make a positive contribution not only to LBS, but to the wider community as well.

The MBA2017 class have of course been involved in many, many more activites and causes, and these are just a couple of my personal highlights. So while we say goodbye to an amazing class, we are also saying hello to a brand new MBA class,  something we in admissions are really excited about! We have been working with the new class since our first application deadline in September and in just a few weeks we welcome all 430 of them on campus. The new class will be as diverse as previous MBA classes, with students from over 70 different nationalities and of course from a variety of different professional backgrounds.

I was privileged to meet some of the new members of the MBA2019 class last month when I went to the annual Forte Foundation conference. At London Business School we invite our Forte Scholarship recipients to join the conference and this year we had four of our MBA2019 admits attending. Inspirational as always, this year the conference was hosted by Amazon in their home town of Seattle, Washington. Whether it was Amazon, the amazing line-up of speakers or the Forte Foundation’s amazing brand, this year’s conference ended up completely sold out! It was attended by more than 600 incoming or current MBA women from over 40 different schools in North America and Europe.  Four of those 600 attendees are starting their MBA at LBS in just a few weeks:

-          Sherry, a brand manager for Clif Bar in California and a wine enthusiast. Enthusiast is actually a real understatement, Sherry has not only worked in vineyards in Napa, she is also named after two wines…Sherry Rose. Sherry’s marketing experience will be extremely valuable for her classmates at LBS, but so will her experience in wine, particularly in the Wine and Spirits club!

- Neressa is a scientist at BioMarin Pharmaceiticals Inc, a biotechnology company which focuses on treatments for rare genetic diseases that mostly affect children. Neressa’s unique science background in a very male-dominated world will provide different perspectives to the classroom discussions. Neressa will bring a completely unique set of skills to her class.

-          Elsa, a finance major who started her career on the trading floor, but later moved into retail in merchandice planning at Macy’s in New York. She is also a keen football player which she will have plenty of opportunities to pursue in the UK.

And finally we were also joined by Shannon, a Boeing engineer specifically in charge of  designing the galleys on 737 air crafts. As part of my trip to Seattle I went to visit Boeing and now fully appreciate the immense complexity of Shannon’s work in designing and building air crafts. So there they are, four women from the MBA2019 class at London Business School each bringing a unique and diverse perspective to their new community. As part of my job I have read most of the applications from the new class and I can tell you that Sherry, Neressa, Elsa and Shannon will be joining a great group of unique and diverse individuals.

So while we were sad to say goodbye to the MBA2017s we also celebrated their achievements and we look forward to welcome the new group of MBAs who are all keen to make an impact on the LBS community.

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The Sloan Masters in Leadership and Strategy is a highly competitive programme and each year the School and the Admissions Committee looks to build the strongest value for the class.

Beyond our world-class faculty and unique programme focus, one of the greatest values of the Sloan programme is the ability to network, learn and absorb information from the other leaders of industry that make up the class. These are individuals who are focussed, well-regarded, experienced and impressive, creating a powerful and rich learning environment.

A glance at the class profile will show that a Sloan Fellow typically has 15-20 years management experience, comes from a variety of a sectors and holds a senior job function.

But a successful Sloan Fellow is much more.

The key attribute we look for in a Sloan Fellow is experience of making decisions at strategic levels, either in a General Management context or as leaders of their function. We know that when the class come together in January, everyone will have had that crucible moment when they have had tough decisions to make.

It is little wonder, therefore, that the most common feedback given to unsuccessful candidates is to reapply when their exposure to these key decisions has grown in scale, impact and depth.

Often an applicant’s level of strategic decision making and leadership cannot be demonstrated solely through their CV, and this is where the application essays are of great importance. These are an opportunity to use your past achievements to demonstrate future success, as part of the programme and beyond, and we recommend you dedicate considerable time perfecting these to showcase your talents, experiences and abilities at their best.

It is also important to choose your referees wisely. These should be people who have worked closely with you for a considerable period – do not simply select the most impressive job title. Your referees can provide a third-party view on your skills as a leader, your strategic decision making abilities, and, just as importantly, your areas for growth as part of this unique cohort of experienced professionals.

Applications are open for the January 2018 intake; you can contact us for more information on this transformative programme.


Inventor of the web Tim Berners-Lee famously said, “We need diversity of thought in the world to face the new challenges”.  An eclectic mix of factors such as gender, ethnicity and experience can encourage the kind of cognitive diversity Berners-Lee meant.

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There are 195 countries in the world today. Before joining London Business School (LBS), current students across all of our programmes studied in 80 of them.

The School’s ever-growing footprint in London and its Dubai campus allows LBS to welcome more students – 2,177 and counting – than ever before.

Ideas are powered by diversity. Nearly 120 nationalities are represented across our programmes, with each student bringing unique world views, experiences and insights. Our graduates leave LBS with broadened horizons and they have a direct impact on the way the world does business.

Our community embraces diversity

Around a third of our current students are women. LBS’s Dean, Professor Sir Andrew Likierman, says: “We are committed to ensuring generations of women leaders flourish throughout their careers, right across the globe.” Learn more about women at LBS here

There has been much talk of Brexit and whether the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union will impact the School’s ability to attract the brightest minds from all corners of the world. In this film, Sir Andrew said he had been reassured that our students are the kinds of people whom officials want to stay in the UK. As a global school we’ll continue to celebrate our richly diverse community.

So, what makes LBS diverse? Our multicultural students. Just as our students thrive on learning from different perspectives, the global business community thrives on the diversity of thought for which our students are known.


 

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An MBA can provide a chance for real career exploration and career change. The period before your MBA is a great time to reflect and mentally prepare yourself for this exciting change.

We’ve found one of the most useful ways to maximise your chances of success in the MBA process is by speaking with current MBA students, recent graduates and potential classmates. Their invaluable insights will be helpful when it comes to understanding the culture of a school – what it is, what it isn’t, and what differentiates it.

If you’re lucky enough to have admissions offers from multiple business schools you really should make an effort to meet your potential classmates at these schools. With any MBA programme, your classmates are pretty much going to be your greatest educators and your greatest asset in your business school education. Of course, amazing professors are a huge part of your learning, but in your personal development, the people you’re surrounded by for hours on end – the other students – are often going to be the ones that build your global understanding.

Our MBA student ambassadors are here to help you understand what it means to join the LBS community. Ambassadors represent a broad range of industries, sectors and nationalities and are on hand to offer you advice through your decision-making journey. Whether you want to learn more about the programme, discover what life on campus is like, or how to maximise your time living in London – they are here to answer any questions you may have.

Contact an MBA Student Ambassador today to start your conversation.


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Funding your studies is an important consideration when looking to undertake a programme of higher education, particularly when the programme of study is full time such as the Sloan MSc.

There are a number of funding options open to potential Sloan Fellows, including company sponsorship, loans and personal finances.

For those the Admissions Committee consider will make an exceptional contribution to the class, we are delighted to offer these scholarships to support future Sloan Fellows:

50th Anniversary Scholarship                   

Closing date for Scholarship submissions: 17:00 (UK time) Wednesday 13 September

Sloan MSc Women’s Scholarship

Closing date for Scholarship submissions: 17:00 (UK time) Wednesday 26 July

Philip Langsdale Scholarship

All applications received before September 2017 will be considered

Sloan Alumni Scholarship

All applications received before Wednesday 26 July will be considered

Sloan Awards

All applications received before Wednesday 26 July will be considered

 

Paul Liu

Prior to the scholarship offer, I was already totally committed to the LBS experience.   I was keenly aware that every other scholarship candidate – chosen from a global and elite base – had equally good credentials, if not better.  Beyond delight, I am truly honoured to be chosen as a scholar of this great institution. I hope to play a critical role in furthering the school’s global charter in the days ahead! Paul Liu – 50th Anniversary Scholar

 

 

Lalaine Valdes

 

 

The scholarship provided additional confidence and confirmed the alignment of purpose between the applicant and LBS in making and contributing to positive change by challenging the status quo on female talent. Lalaine Valdes – Women’s Scholar

 

 

Donald Mi

 

 

It made me feel even more confident to join the programme. I can feel the trust from the programme and LBS, as well as the responsibilities. I know I have a lot to contribute to the class and the programme. Donald Mi – Philip Langsdale Scholar

 

 

 

 

Our Scholars truly are some of the best and brightest of the cohort; they are not only recognised for their contribution to business thus far, but also in anticipation of their contribution to the success of the class, the Sloan MSc, and the wider School community.

Applications for these Scholarships are open now, and more details can be found on our website.

 


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Diversity is good for business, this much we know. Studies have shown that companies which embrace diversity have better performance, both human and financial. Seems like a no-brainer, right? In thinking about gender diversity, why is it then that we have yet to see an equal number of men and women in the boardroom, or the pay gap narrowing? There is no question that there’s work to be done to make this happen, and business schools are in a position to do so. My colleague Stephanie Thrane’s recent blog post Why we need more women in business schools sums up our role well: “As a top business school we are educating future global leaders. Leaders of large international organisations who will go on to shape the business of the future. The more women who go on to graduate from business schools the more women we are able to promote into leadership roles. The more women we have in leadership roles the more opportunities we have to change outdated c-suite norms, in-equality in pay, maternity leave policies and the list goes on.”

 

So, how as a business school can we help to build this pipeline? London Business School continues to take steps to ensure equal representation of women within the community, with initiatives including increasing the proportion of applications from female faculty shortlisted for interview for untenured positions, encouraging female applicants to apply through initiatives with the Women in Business Club and also enhanced scholarships, easier identification of classroom case studies with female protagonists, and through covering equality and diversity from day one in the classroom at Orientation.

 

It’s vital that professionals from all backgrounds and demographics engage in the conversation of gender equality, and this is a conversation in which both men and women need to be involved – they each make-up half of the world’s population, so makes sense that each is at the table. We need to discuss how gender, and the stereotyping and bias which may come along with it, affects the way in which we work, and how our perceptions of gender may positively and negatively affect our organisations.

 

And it’s not just professionals who should be taking into account these considerations. In thinking about the pipeline it’s vital that students are also engaged in this discussion. In this post, MiM2017 Lola Wajskop shares her experience in looking at the issue of gender equality in the classroom:

 

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Diversity matters. I’ve said it before and I’ll keep saying it: building and nurturing diverse teams – both in universities and in the workplace – is not only the right thing to do, it also makes business sense. I’ve been passionate about gender diversity specifically ever since I read Lean In, the first book of Sheryl Sandberg (if you haven’t read it: I strongly recommend it!). The book opened my eyes to many issues related to gender equality. Over the past few years I’ve focused on the issue of women in engineering and tech and decided to take action: before joining LBS, I launched “Yes She Can” with my friend Lola, an initiative aimed at attracting more female students into STEM education.

 

When I decided to pursue a second masters, I carefully studied the “MiM landscape”, considering which business school should I apply to? London Business School was my absolute first choice: the school had a stellar academic reputation, but I was even more attracted by its effort to build a community as diverse as possible. The school really understands that the quality of our experience is proportional to the level of diversity in the classroom – whether nationalities, backgrounds, aspirations or gender.

 

I strongly believe that business schools, and especially LBS, are major players in the fight for gender equality. The reason is simple: if we joined the MiM programme, it is because at some point in the near future we would like to manage – manage organisations, manage people, manage countries (who knows?!). This makes it very likely that a significant part of the class will aim for leadership positions during their careers. If business schools foster a culture and a community where gender equality is a high priority, where people understand and talk about why diversity matters in the workplace, it is likely that these same people – my friends – will actively seek to recreate a similar culture in the organisations that they join or create. Basically, we’ll leave the world in a better place than we found it. And LBS definitely aims to do just that.

 

Gender parity is a top priority at the faculty level (where I know it is a topic that is researched thoroughly), and on the student side, too. As an example, I was attending last week the annual “Multiple:X” conference of the Private Equity and Venture Capital Club. When I got there, I was shocked by the small number of women attending – the room was largely dominated by men, perhaps not surprising knowing that finance is one of those fields that is dominated by men. But then I realised that the students organising the event actively tried to promote equality and get women engaged in the event:
(1) the speakers and panellists included women – and I was very pleased to hear from most of my friends attending that their one favourite speaker was a woman, Zeina Bain, Managing Director at the Carlyle Group;

(2) there was a panel dedicated entirely to gender diversity in the workplace,

(3) there was a good mix of male and female presenters represented, including  my friends Stefan and Rachel, and they both did an incredible job at keeping the day going. This is just one example, but it truly represents what the school and its community stands for: we actively look to make a difference, as often as we can.

 

Another example would be the ManBassador programme. Born within the Women in Business Club, ManBassadors are a group of male students who actively pledge to support the gender equality cause. It is one of my favourite initiatives at LBS – how can a conversation about gender be useful if only women are taking part in it? My friend Jake organised a ManBassador lunch a few weeks ago, during which about 15 MiM students – men and women – discussed gender parity issues and shared experiences about. I loved it. My male friends were listening carefully, sometimes surprised by what we were telling them, sometimes angry to realise that women had to face such adversity. They shared their experiences and how gender roles are viewed in their home countries. It was an eye-opening conversation for many, and definitely a valuable experience for everyone who was there.

 

Finally, I’d like to acknowledge the incredible support of my female friends here at LBS. We know that women are stronger when they support each other, and I truly learned the importance of this support during this year. My friend Sara, for example, who is doing the Masters in Financial Analysis, is my #1 fan. When I have interviews, she jumps for joy. When I had my first job offers, she kept on telling me how proud she was and how much I deserved it. Having a strong group of strong women supporting each other is one of these things that I got from LBS and that will (hopefully) follow me during the rest of my life, and it’s a pretty invaluable gift.

 

My last point would be that LBS is an excellent platform for you to experiment and train yourself for your future career. Try, practice and jump on every occasion to build your self-confidence. Not a big fan of public speaking? Stretch yourself and share your point of view in class. Never liked taking the lead in a group? Go and take ownership of as many projects as you can in your study group. You’re here to learn, fail (sometimes) and progress (always). This is your chance to build the best version of yourself: when you leave LBS, it will be with confidence and with a crowd of incredible women cheering on you.

 

See more about Women at LBS


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At most business schools you will find similarities in the course content, the academics and the case studies used. What differs and sets them apart is the environment you study and develop in.

At London Business School it is easy to point to the key characteristics that help to define this environment; the city of London, the diversity of the classroom, the practical nature of the academics. However a key characteristic that is vitally important for Early Career students in particular is the cross-generational learning opportunities. The LBS campus is diverse, not just by nationalities but by the range of experience levels of its students. Our MBA/MIF students have on average five years of experience and our leadership (EMBA portfolio) students have on average twelve. For a small community like LBS these individuals are easily accessible and quickly become part of your network. To learn and socialise amongst them can broaden your horizons and expose you to insights and learnings that would not be easily accessible in a standard workplace.

Within the Early Career Programmes there are three key opportunities to maximise the impact of cross-generational learning:

1. Electives

Students have access to a range of elective courses whilst studying on the Early Career Programmes. Not only does this allow you to begin to specialise your knowledge but you are in the classroom with students from across our Degree Education portfolio. With a vast range of diverse experience in an elective class this presents the opportunity to gain insights and thinking for tackling problems or solving issues.

However much experience or insight an individual has, everyone is treated equal allowing for Early Careers students to have an impact and opinion on assignments and tasks. It is a mutually beneficial relationship for all involved.

2. Mentors

There are a multitude of mentorship opportunities for Early Career Students through the MBA/MiF mentoring scheme or seeking out one of the alumni mentors. Equally within the community it is common place to find mentors in clubs/societies that can guide and advise on your next career steps.

Ben Jeffery (MiM2016) met his mentor, Mark Hosking (MBA2016) through the peer leader sessions run by the Career Centre. As Ben was preparing for a career in consultancy they staged mock interviews and went through the types of questions that he would face. “I had strong analytical and quantitative skills, but wasn’t familiar with how to present ideas to interviewers at a consulting firm” says Ben.  Both Ben and his mentor now work together at BCG and Ben highlights “Having a friendly face around the office is great, if I’m not sure about something, Mark’s my first port of call.”

 3.Clubs/Societies

The clubs at LBS represent the heart of the community and provide the opportunity to engage with individuals over mutual interests and passions. They are made up of students from across the degree portfolio and cover a wide range of professional, personal and cultural interests. Being a member of a professional club and gaining industry insight from experienced students is an invaluable experience. We often hear stories of students finding their future business partners in the clubs as this is a key way to network across the full community of students.

 

London Business School actively seeks to bring in a diverse group of students to create a melting pot of ideas and views. Whilst we can influence who studies at the school, the community evolves in an organic way and provides opportunities for students to grow professionally, academically and personally. For Early Career students this community represents the first step into the business world and we actively look for those who will make a positive impact towards London Business School.

Find out more about the London Business School community


The Sloan Masters in Leadership and Strategy is unique in European top business school offerings in focusing on the experienced executive in a full time degree. As the class of 2017 move into their second term, here are a select few of the many highlights of the term just finished beyond the engaging, informative and educational core programme.

Orientation

The year started at full pace with a jam-packed Orientation week, as study combined with invaluable team-building and networking to ensure the Sloan journey started on a strong footing. Find out more about this exciting kick-off in our earlier blog post.

Case study with Lord John Bird

Lord Bird, founder of The Big Issue, joined the Sloan
Fellows for a singular case study in February. Lord Bird is both a talented and inspirational businessman and speaker, facing early hardship to become a well-known entrepreneur and member of the House of Lords.

His enthusiastically received session with our Sloan 2017 cohort was a fantastic opportunity to explore entrepreneurship and social responsibility whilst engaging with this unique individual. Such was the reception that we have made the full presentation
available online.

Career Events

As a full time programme, more often than not the Sloan MSc requires participants to step away from their current job roles and careers. At London Business School, we have a well-developed Career Management offering tailored to the needs of the experienced executives and entrepreneurs who become Sloan Fellows.

The first term has included a variety of workshops, covering career development, networking, getting investment ready for entrepreneurs and exploring and developing resilience.

The Career Centre also played host to ‘The Challenge of Change’ presentation with Mohan Mohan, (LBS Executive in Residence), a  retired Procter & Gamble senior executive, having had a memorable career spread over three continents. Mohan delivered a motivational presentation covering topics such as how to approach time at London Business School, how to pursue the definition of career goals and how to approach your career development, as well as coaching sessions with our Sloan Fellows.

End of term celebration

To mark the end of a memorable but exhausting term, celebratory drinks and a dinner was hosted by the School here at our central London Campus.

Find out more

If this has whetted your appetites for the Sloan experience, why not come to an information evening to find out more, as well as meet some current and/or former students? Details of future events can be found on our website.

For a taste of the Sloan experience first-hand, we also offer the opportunity for applicants to the Sloan 2018 cohort to visit a class. You can join the current Sloan MSc cohort and gain an insight into our world-class faculty, ground-breaking research and network with existing students to discover if the Sloan journey is the right path for you.

We have two modules open for visitors over a number of days to maximise the opportunities available; you can sign up here or find out more by contacting sloan@London.edu.

 

 

 


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There are plenty of reasons to choose a Masters in Finance (MiF) at LBS. Here are half a dozen

Research shows that you should spend your money on experiences, not things. You might say, “What do people have to show after six-course dinners and long-haul holidays?” You might say that buying a better car is the smarter option. But we adapt to things (like shiny new cars) quickly. Experiences last.

At LBS, we believe the best investment you can make is in yourself and your education. What’s more, our programmes are experiences, not things.

 

Why a Masters in Finance at LBS? Here are six reasons

 

 1. One size doesn’t fit all

You can choose a format that fits your needs. The School draws strength from people’s differences so we understand the importance of a learning experience that works for you. Spend 10–16 months immersing yourself in our full-time programme or continue working as you learn with our flexible two-year part-time programme.

 2. Find your hashtag

MiF students have plenty of professional experience so they might already have a hashtag – a specialism or an area of expertise. To help you find and hone yours, you can tailor each of our programmes to suit your goals through an extensive range of electives, practitioner courses, industry-focused events and international experiences.

3. Achieve your career goals

We know the MiF is a big investment. Meeting your career goals is key to your return on investment. Are you an experienced finance professional seeking to advance your career? Do you want to switch to another area, function or region, or deepen your knowledge? Whatever your motivation, you’ll benefit from the support and advice of our dedicated careers team who can help you achieve your goals.

4. Renowned thought leaders

LBS faculty provide commentary on the finance industry’s burning topics – from Bitcoin to Brexit. Their research helps shape policy, their insights strengthen the finance sector and their academic theory is amplified by real-world experience, giving them a powerful voice inside and outside the classroom.

 5. London: the financial capital of the world

“When it comes to attracting talented workers, London is the city to beat,” wrote LBS blogger Rob Morris. There’s no better place for you to study finance than London. Our strong links with financial institutions, recruiters and practitioners make us proud – and they make us unique.

6. Learn, apply, do it again

You’ll not only learn with some of the best financial and business minds in the world, but you’ll benefit from experiential learning: the process of learning by doing. After all, we’re talking about an experience. If you could get this from a textbook you’d just buy it, right?

Broaden your international outlook, build your skills and do it in a format suited to you: that’s a long list of benefits. What about the drawbacks? We’re trying to find one.

 

There’s still time to join this year’s programme
If you have 3+ years experience in a finance role then don’t miss out on this exceptional opportunity. Visit our website for further information.


Ignite your entrepreneurial spirit

Do you have ambitions of developing your own business venture? If you have between seven and 22 years of experience and a strong professional track record why not consider our Executive MBA (EMBA) programme. By choosing to study your EMBA at London Business School, you will benefit from a range of services and facilities specially designed to develop and expand your entrepreneurial perspective.

The Entrepreneurship Summer School gives you the chance to assess and shape your business opportunity in a robust and practical way. This programme aims to help you to succeed as an entrepreneur by providing you with the skills you need to choose which business opportunities to pursue and how to develop those ideas into workable businesses.

The LBS Incubator programme supports a selected number of graduating students and recent graduates to use the School’s facilities to launch your business. Zipporah Gatiti, Founder of Taste of Kenya credits the Incubator for offering almost everything a new business needs, as well as a mentorship programme that goes above and beyond: “If having a mentor was the only thing I’d received, it would have been worth it. Mentors are like co-founders. They study your company, help keep you on track and hold you accountable.”

There are many opportunities to learn from the professionals, the Entrepreneurship Mentor in Residence Programme provides the chance for students to learn from expert entrepreneur mentors from a range of sectors and disciplines. The famous TELL Series also showcases successful entrepreneurs’ personal stories.

Navin Valrani studied the EMBA Dubai programme and the two years changed his life and career forever. “It was wonderful in so many aspects,” he says. “First of all, the knowledge that you pick up on the EMBA gives you a fantastic toolkit to work with. You’re exposed to the most outstanding faculty you could possibly come across, and you can socialise with them after class and have some really good informal discussions. I am where I am today in my life, and with the growth rates of the businesses that I lead, because of LBS.”

Lidia Chmel decided it was time for a change of company, function and industry and founded her own company, Mama’s Dream Club. She says “I would never have had the courage to start my own company without the EMBA programme. Exploring case studies and hearing from guest speakers who had founded their own companies showed me that it was eminently possible to change direction and still be successful.”

The LBS Entrepreneurship Club provides a forum for students to network and share ideas and an environment which fosters innovation and entrepreneurship and helps students to cultivate and develop their own ideas.

Heather Baker, Founder & CEO, Top Line Comms says of her EMBA experience “The EMBA has been an exceptional experience, both personally and professionally. I am far more confident and analytical in the way I approach business development now, so much so that the company has doubled in size over the last 18 months. I’m not originally from London, so for me, making new contacts with the local business community has been just as vital as linking to the huge global network the School offers.” 

If you are thinking about how you’ll finance your venture, we have relationships with Sussex Place Ventures and Enterprise 100, who have been fundamental in helping new start-ups. Students also have the opportunity to pitch their ideas before investors and benchmark their plans against those from other schools. Competitions include, European Business Plan of the Year Competition, Venture Capital Investment Competitions and Global Social Venture Competition. See further information about Competitions.

Start your entrepreneurial journey at LBS. The next deadline for the class starting this autumn is Tuesday 2 May. See further information on applying to the programme.